Lower Austria is now getting 100% of its electricity from renewable energy and is able to provide electricity for a population of 1.65-million residents.

Recently, Lower Austria, which is the largest of Austria’s 9 states began sourcing 100% of its electrical energy from renewable sources.  This is great news right before the big UN climate summit in Paris this year.  This is where world leaders will come together and work on battling climate change by setting new standards, reviewing scientific data, and push countries to use renewable resources.  

A lot of hard work is going into efforts like this all over the world.  Recently at a news conference Erwin Proell spoke about the Success in Lower Austria.

“We have invested heavily to boost energy efficiency and to expand renewables. Since 2002 we have invested 2.8 billion euros (US$3 billion) in eco-electricity, from solar parks to renewing (hydroelectric) stations on the Danube.”

These hydroelectric stations down in the south produce most of the state’s energy 63% or two-thirds of the electrical power from Lower Austria is from hydroelectric power, 26% of the power comes from wind energy and the rest comes from biomass (9%) and solar power systems (2%).

Becuase of its investment in renewable energy, Lower Austria has been able to create around 38,000 ‘green energy jobs’.  By the end of 2030 the state is hoping to raise that number to 50,000 positions.

While Lower Austria is now running on 100% renewable clean energy the rest of the nation isn’t very far behind.  Countrywide around 75% of the electricity is coming from renewable energy sources.

When it comes to European Union countries, Austria is winning the race when it come to becoming fossil fuel free.  The next most advanced countries are Sweden, Portugal, Latvia and then Denmark.

If you remember a few months back Denmark was able to generate 140% of its needs in one day because of a particularly windy day.

Spread the word to let all countries of the world know that we want to be 100% renewable.

Sources:

www.trueactivist.com

theguardian.com