On April 10, 1912, the Titanic — a ship believed to be “unsinkable” — set off on its maiden voyage from Southhampton, England, to New York. Just four days later, the ship carrying 2,206 people, including a crew of 898, violently scraped the side of an iceberg.

The collision occurred at 11:40 pm, and came as a surprise to the captain and crewmates, as previous messages sent via radio from other ships had not reached the bridge. When the Titanic hit the iceberg, six compartments were ripped open. However, the ship’s design could only withstand four compartments flooding.

Within minutes, the crew radioed for help and sent out an SOS signal. But, it was already too late. Ten minutes after midnight, the orders for passengers to head for the lifeboats was given. As those who have watched the Titanic movie (starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio) know, there weren’t enough lifeboats. Additionally, there had been no instruction or drills regarding an emergency evacuation procedure. This resulted in panic breaking out on deck.

The bulk of passengers who made it on the lifeboats were women who had been traveling in first-class. History reports that third-class passengers weren’t even allowed on deck until the first-class female passengers had departed the ship.

By 2:20 am, the Titanic had sunk. It broke in half, one end plunging downward to the sea floor. Captain Edward Smith remained on the ship. Approximately one hour later, The Carpathia arrived to rescue survivors. In total, 1,517 people had gone down with the ship. 705 people had made it into lifeboats. Reportedly, the ones who were forced into the icy waters all perished.

After the event, officials blamed the tragedy on the captain and the bridge crew — all of whom had died. After the accident, significant effort was given to improve safety measures. For instance, every vessel is now required to have sufficient lifeboat capacity for all passengers.

In 1985, divers were finally able to locate the wreckage of the Titanic on the floor of the North Atlantic. Now that it has been over a century since the ship sunk, we remember the fateful event which has evolved into a legendary story.  It teaches about the dangers of hubris and the perils that await many voyagers on the open water.

Following are 28 pictures from the Titanic you’ve probably never seen before:

1) Unfinished, at Belfast, on May 31, 1911.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

2) Under construction

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

3) The Titanic, ready to be launched

Credit: Library of Congress

4) Titanic leaving Belfast for sea trials on April 2, 1912.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

5) The Olympic, the Titanic’s sister ship, docked in New York City on the same day that the Titanic left Southampton, England.

Credit: Library of Congress

6)The iceberg suspected of having sunk the RMS Titanic. This iceberg was photographed by the chief steward of the liner Prinz Adalbert on the morning of April 15, 1912, just a few miles south of where the Titanic went down.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

7) The last lifeboat off the Titanic.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

8) This composite of five mounted photographs shows the wireless operator on board receiving a distress call; lifeboats bringing the Titanic’s survivors to the Carpathia, and Capt. Smith of the Titanic.

Credit: Library of Congress

9) The Titanic’s lifeboats on their way to the Carpathia

Credit: Library of Congress

10) A tugboat on its way to meet the Carpathia

Credit: Library of Congress

11) Survivors of the Titanic safely aboard the Carpathia

Credit: Library of Congress

12) A crowd gathers to await the arrival of the Titanic’s survivors

Credit: Library of Congress

13) Another shot of the growing and anxious crowd

Credit: Library of Congress

14) Mrs. Charlotte Collyer with her daughter Marjorie, both of whom survived the disaster

Credit: Library of Congress

15) These French boys, brothers Michel (age four) and Edmond Navratil (age two) boarded the ship with their father, who assumed the name Louis Hoffman. Hoffman did not survive. This photo was taken before the orphans were properly identified.

Credit: Library of Congress

16) A young family of survivors

Credit: Library of Congress

17) Mrs. J.J. Brown (“The Unsinkable Molly Brown”) presenting a trophy cup award to Carpathia Captain Arthur Henry Roston for his service in the rescue of the Titanic.

Credit: Library of Congress

18) Over 14,000 people attended a Yankees vs. Giants baseball game to raise funds for the RMS Titanic survivors.

Credit: Library of Congress

19) Entertainer George M. Cohan (left) selling special Sunday copies of the New York American newspaper to benefit survivors and their families.

Credit: Library of Congress

20) A chorus girl at the baseball game

Credit: Library of Congress

21) Outside the White Star Line office after the disaster

Credit: Library of Congress

22) Captain Arthur Henry Rostron next to the silver loving cup that Titanic survivors presented to him in May 1912

Credit: Library of Congress

23) Mrs. J.J. Brown as she leaves the Carpathia

Credit: Library of Congress

24) Stuart Collett, survivor of the Titanic

Credit: Library of Congress

25) Portrait of Captain Arthur Henry Rostron.

Credit: Library of Congress

26) Oscar Solomon Straus (United States Secretary of Commerce and Labor) with his wife Sarah at the 1915 dedication of Straus Memorial Park in New York City. This marked the third anniversary of the death of his brother Isidore Straus and his wife Ida on the Titanic.

Credit: Library of Congress

27) Straus Memorial Park in New York City. The city had it built to commemorate those who died on board the Titanic.

Credit: Library of Congress

28)Funeral services in memory of the Titanic at Seamen’s Church Institute, New York City.

Credit: Library of Congress

h/t All That Is Interesting