Iceland is a popular destination among nature lovers and photographers. This is because the small country is full of natural wonders, such as glaciers, waterfalls, black sand beaches, hot springs and even volcanoes. On the topic of volcanos, one of the largest in Iceland recently erupted in over 200 years. Fortunately for us all, photographer Axel Sigurðarson, who was born and raised in Reykjavík, documented the fantastic happening.

MyModernMet reports that Sigurðarson was fortunate to grow up exploring the Icelandic Highlands, which is a sought-after destination by landscape photographers. While on a road trip to Holuhraun, a large lava field situated just north of the Vatnajökull ice cap, the photographer captured something even more spectacular.

For the first time since 1783, the Bárðarbunga was erupting. Its latest eruption lasted from August 29, 2014, to February 27, 2015. To say the photographs are remarkable is an understatement.

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Sigurðarson’s views from land and air reveal nature’s incredible fury. In some of the photographs, huge clouds of dust and gas belch forth from the Earth, In others, red-hot molten rock blasts through the planet’s crust then allows gravity to guide it downward. One particularly poignant image shows an airplane dwarfed by the spewing volcano.

While photographing the phenomena, Sigurðarson also captured images of scientists he met along the way. They included renowned Seismologist Ragnar “Skjálfti” Stefánsson, who was on-site conducting research.

You can learn more about Sigurðarson and view his extraordinary work by visiting his website and Instagram.

Reykjavík photographer Axel Sigurðarson captured the volcanic eruption of Bárðarbunga, Holuhraun.

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

The stunning photos document red-hot molten rock, eruptions of lava, and clouds of gas and dust.

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Sigurðarson also photographed numerous scientists he met along the way. They were conducting research on the phenomena.

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson

Credit: Axel Sigurðarson


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