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Mathematical Report Proves Human Society Is Too Complex to Be Ruled by a Government

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Society is past the point of being governed. We no longer need a president to function as a healthy society. In fact, the idea of central bodies of government ruling over differing classes of people is just absurd. We are all just too complex for a ruler! At least, this is what a recent report suggests.

Is there hope for us?

Prior to election day, Vice’s Motherboard published a report called Mathematics, which included proof that democracies are irrelevant to our society today. Social policy, or the idea that one process can work for everyone, has been deemed ludicrous as society is much too complex, and government always fails us in our expectations.

A complex organism

We, as humans, have become increasingly complex over time, which has no relation to democracy or communism. And this complexity matters, says Yaneer Bar-Yam, the New England Complex Systems Institutes (NECSI)’s director,

“There’s a natural process of increasing complexity in the world that at some point will run into the complexity of the individual. Once we reach that point, hierarchical organizations will fail.”

Bar-Yam realized how ridiculous it was to organize society into sections of a few. Government officials are, in most cases, detached from individual situations from lack of experience in the area.

Bar-Yam told Motherboard,

We are raised to believe that democracy is good for us.”

Is this true? I think Democracy is over-rated, and so are other systems such as dictatorships and communism. Their centralized processes and democracies only focus on one or few groups of individuals, still leaving others with no ample representation. It just fails!

Human complexity

When discussing the individual needs of society, “human action” takes form as a possible solution to this problem. If you look at the human as a unique creature as compared to another, you may get the idea of why we are much too complex to be ruled as a group.

Humans are made from atoms, which make cells and then organs. If you try to describe an individual atom, it’s almost impossible. It’s only possible in relation to collective behavior of the whole. At least, it’s a bit easier.

This works in much the same manner when describing an individual person in a job, as opposed to a workforce. It’s easier to understand the pattern of an entire workforce than to catalog the daily behavior of one worker.

Is there a solution?

Bar-Yam suggests a solution called a “control hierarchy”, which enables an individual to control only their own actions separately from others. With this, one individual can influence others into taking the same actions. If this works, it will prove much more effective than hoping the government will influence a larger group into following their lead. In fact, what government does, in a nutshell, is control groups of people as if they are much simpler beings.

Human action

In fact, these aren’t new ideas. They are, in fact, ideas that surfaced in 1949 as well. Praxeology, or the study of purposeful behavior (human action), said that humans exist and act for a reason, basically.

“Action is will put into operation.”

Economist Ludwig von Mises said that those who are detached from a situation cannot possibly know what will happen inside the situation. Although science is pretty accurate at predicting what will happen in a situation, it cannot predict the future without question. And no matter the similarities from one situation to the next, there will always be incomplete knowledge with any given event or within any new group. It’s apparent that Mises understood the complexity of society way before Bar-Yam was involved in the study.

Mises writes in “Human Action”,

“Government means coercion and compulsion and is the opposite of liberty.”

Both Mises and Bar-Yam concluded that complexities of the human being, especially the level in which humans have attained at this point, makes it almost impossible for the government to rule effectively.

As we saw with the elections, numerous people refusing to vote, the desire for the governmental rule is on the decline. Choosing leaders obviously doesn’t matter as much anymore, and working as individuals to solve problems may just be what we need to thrive as human beings.

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UK Queen’s Statues Torn Down Amid Anger Over Mass Graves for Indigenous Children

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This year may have had one of the most muted Canada Day celebrations, but this didn’t stop Indigenous protesters from making their anger felt – especially in the wake of the discovery of over 1,000 children’s bodies near the residential schools run by the Canadian state and church authorities.

And with churches being likely targeted by arsonists for the crimes of Catholic clergy, protesters are now attacking the symbols of Anglo colonialism – namely, statues of Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria.

More than 200 children’s bodies were discovered buried in a mass grave in May, with several hundreds more being discovered in June at unmarked gravesites near Indian residential schools in June.

About 150,000 First Nations children were forcibly separated from their families and communities and forced to attend the religious schools which were established in the 19th century to assimilate Indigenous children into the Anglo settler-colonial culture of Canada.

Former students have testified to the horrific sexual, mental and physical abuse they suffered while enrolled at the schools. Myriad children died from preventable diseases, as well as in accidents and fires. Others disappeared when trying to escape. The Commission has denounced the schools for institutionalizing child neglect and for being organs of “cultural genocide.”

The discoveries have churned up deep-seated anguish and memories of the suffering visited upon First Nations peoples, with many lashing out at the symbols of colonialism.

At least seven churches, all but one of which were Catholic, have also come under apparent arson attacks throughout Canada in recent weeks.

In June, a statue of the late Pope John Paul II at a Catholic church in Edmonton was splattered with red paint and red handprints.

On Thursday, July 1, residents in Canada also held organized protests and pulled down the statues of the top figurehead of British colonialism: Queen Elizabeth II, as well as that of her great grandmother, Queen Victoria. Sky News reports that the toppling of the statues was accompanied by the chant, “No Pride in Genocide!”

In Ottawa, protestors gathered en masse at Parliament Hill chanting ”Cancel Canada Day” and ”shame on Canada,” urging an end to the national holiday over the deaths of Indigenous people.

Indigenous groups and Canadian politicians are demanding an apology from the Catholic Church – specifically Pope Francis. The event could take place by year’s end, according to the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops.

However, it remains unlikely that the British crown will offer the same amends to Canada’s Indigenous nations who, like many across the globe, suffered greatly in British Colonialism’s worldwide search for riches and glory.

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3 Reasons Why Introverts Are Undervalued in Today’s Society

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It’s undeniable that our society favors assertive extroverted personalities with strong communication skills and underestimates the quiet ones. If you are an introvert, you have probably learned it the hard way.

It could be that you felt unseen in the classroom as a child or teen. Or you may have watched your less competent co-workers get a promotion thanks to their social skills.

It feels unfair, but if you think about our society, it makes perfect sense. The consumerist mindset that has become our second nature inevitably affects the way we treat other people. It seems that everything, including our personal qualities and worth as human beings, is translated into some kind of market value.

In other words, to make other people see your worth in personal or professional life, you need to be able to ‘sell yourself’. Yes, this expression alone tells it all.

You need to know how to make a good first impression, say the right things, and be assertive. If you can’t do it, you are perceived as incapable and uninteresting – whether we are talking about a job interview or an informal social gathering.

But it’s not the only reason why introverts are undervalued in our society. Here are a few more:

1. They are less efficient in teamwork

Communication and teamwork skills are required for all kinds of jobs. It seems that without being able to work in a team, it’s impossible to do your job even if your duties don’t involve interaction with clients.

Introverts are much more efficient when they work on their own and are given a certain extent of independence. They thrive in quiet environments with few distractions and interactions. This is when a quiet person gets the chance to unleash their creative self and make good use of their analytical skills.

Most office jobs don’t give employees this opportunity. Office meetings, group projects, phone calls and all the other attributes of a 9-to-5 job make it almost impossible for an introvert to be productive.

2. They don’t like to be in the spotlight

Sometimes it feels like we are living in a society of attention seekers. Today, you are expected to go public about the most personal matters, such as your relationship and family life.

People share their most intimate thoughts and feelings on social media, post updates about the most trivial events, such as what they had for dinner, and upload countless selfies.

Introverts are among those who still value privacy. They are less likely to showcase their lives online or share the details of their personal affairs with the whole world.

At the same time, the quiet ones don’t like to be in the spotlight at social events. An introvert will never interrupt you. They will listen to you and talk only when they have something important to say. This tendency to avoid attention can be mistaken for insecurity and even a lack of intelligence.

3. They prefer to be real than to be ‘nice’

If you want to make a good impression on others, you are expected to be nice. But what does it mean to be ‘nice’ anyway?

In an introvert’s mind, it equals saying things you don’t mean. Quiet personalities will never bombard you with compliments or say meaningless social pleasantries just to win your fondness. But if an introvert said something nice to you, then be sure that they truly meant it.

Small talk is another component of social relationships most introverts struggle with. To them, it embodies utterly dull, uncomfortable, and pointless conversations they can perfectly do without. For this reason, introverts are often mistakenly believed to hate people.

The truth is that they don’t – they just crave stimulating, meaningful conversations and choose their social circle more carefully than extroverts.

In my book, The Power of Misfits: How to Find Your Place in a World You Don’t Fit In, I write about the reasons why so many introverts feel inadequate and alienated from other people in today’s society. It all goes down to social expectations this personality type has to deal with from a very early age.

But the good news is that every introvert can overcome the negative effects of these expectations and find the right path in this loud, extroverted world.

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