Connect with us

Health

As Overdose Deaths Soar, Dark Web Drug Dealers Voluntarily Ban Fentanyl

Published

on

Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

Major dark web drug suppliers have started to voluntarily ban the synthetic opioid fentanyl because it is too dangerous, the National Crime Agency has said.

They are “delisting” the high-strength painkiller, effectively classifying it alongside mass-casualty firearms and explosives as commodities that are considered too high-risk to trade. Fentanyl can be up to 100 times stronger than heroin and can easily cause accidental overdoses, particularly when mixed with heroin.

Vince O’Brien, one of the NCA’s leads on drugs, told the Observer that dark web marketplace operators appeared to have made a commercial decision, because selling a drug that could lead to fatalities was more likely to prompt attention from police.
Advertisement

It is the first known instance of these types of operators moving to effectively ban a drug.

O’Brien said:

“If they’ve got people selling very high-risk commodities then it’s going to increase the risk to them. There are marketplaces that will not accept listings for weapons and explosives – those are the ones that will not accept listings for fentanyl. Clearly, law enforcement would prioritize the supply of weapons, explosives and fentanyl over, for example, class C drugs – and that might well be why they do this.

“There are also drug users on the dark web who say on forums that they don’t think it’s right that people are selling fentanyl because it is dangerous and kills a lot of people.”

Fentanyl arrived in the UK around 18 months ago and so far is said to have caused around 160 deaths, with fatalities caused by the opioid rising by nearly 30% last year, according to the Office for National Statistics.

One type of fentanyl, carfentanyl, is thousands of times stronger than heroin and O’Brien confirmed that police had made a number of small seizures of the substance in the UK. In the US, fentanyl has taken a significantly more profound hold on the drugs sector and has replaced heroin in many major US drug markets, precipitating a more deadly phase of the nation’s opioid epidemic. The number of overdose deaths associated with fentanyl and similar drugs has grown to more than 29,000 a year, from 3,000 five years ago. Deaths were up by more than 45% in 2017.

O’Brien said that the NCA is working with US law enforcement agencies to prevent the UK from having a similar fentanyl epidemic, though the number of people dependent on opioids in the UK compared to America means it has a much smaller market.

“We are working closely with international partners in terms of how the threat developed there. It’s an emerging new drug, a threat we’re taken very seriously because of what happened in the US,” said O’Brien. The NCA has had a series of successes against UK fentanyl dealers, who typically source the drug from China and then sell it on the dark web. The first fentanyl case to be sentenced in the UK involved Kyle Enos, 25, from Newport who was jailed for eight years in February. Enos had procured the narcotic from China, selling it worldwide and to customers in 30 UK police areas.

Colin Williams, senior NCA investigating officer on the case, said: “We realised within a number of hours we had to deal with this very quickly.”

Even so, as they tracked down the 160 or so clients who had bought fentanyl from Enos to warn them that the drug was deadly, they learned that four of his customers were already dead. “We can’t say whether they took the drug but they were certainly on his [customer] list,” said Williams.

Enos, himself a fentanyl and heroin user, was aware of the risks and had informed each customer that the substance was liable to kill.

O’Brien added: “Every time we take down a dark web vendor we follow up with customers, and when we have done that, a number are turning up dead – there’s a real cautionary tale there.”

Some of the biggest dark web fentanyl suppliers were closed down last year with the most famous – Alphabay – often described as the largest underground market ever seen – shut following a global police investigation.

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]

Health

Fitness Coach Shares Army Technique To Fall Asleep In 2 Minutes

Published

on

Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

We’re guessing that at least a few of you may have had a few nights – if not countless ones – where sleep didn’t necessarily come easily.

Indeed, about one in four Americans has experienced a strong bout of insomnia at some point each year. The sleeping disorder leads to poor health, weakened immunity and daytime fatigue, among other problems.

However, self-proclaimed fitness expert and personal trainer Justin Agustin claims that he knows the secret to slipping into a good night’s rest within minutes.

Agustin recently shared the video on TikTok, captioning his video with the exciting title: “Technique to falling asleep in two minutes!” 

The clip has since racked up several million views, around 300,000 likes and thousands of comments, with many verifying that the technique worked for them.

@justin_agustin

Technique to falling asleep in 2 minutes! Insp. AsapSCIENCE on YT #sleep #fallasleep #insomnia #insomniac #learnontiktok #howto

♬ You – Petit Biscuit

“This technique was developed in the military to allow soldiers to fall asleep at any time, any place – even on the battlefield when the environment is extremely uncomfortable and there’s a lot of noise happening … Sleep for a soldier is crucial,” Agustin explained.

“According to my research, this was developed mainly for fighter pilots who need 100 percent of their reflexes and focus, which we all know decreases with the lack of sleep,” he added. 

“You simply have to start by ‘calming your body’ by shutting down and relaxing each part of your body, from ‘head to toe’. 

“Start by relaxing the muscles in your forehead,” Agustin continued.

“Relax your eyes, your cheeks, your jaw and focus on your breathing. Now go down to your neck and your shoulders. 

“Make sure your shoulders are not tensed up. Drop them as low as you can and keep your arms loose by your side, including your hands and fingers.” 

As you do this, you should ‘imagine this warm sensation going from your head to all the way down to your fingertips. 

“Take a deep breath and slowly exhale, relaxing your chest, your stomach, down to your thighs, knees, legs and feet,” he said.

“Again, imagine this warm sensation going down from your heart all the way to your toes.” 

Continuing, Agustin explained that the purpose was to “clear your mind of any stresses.” 

“To do this, think of two scenarios: One – you’re lying in a canoe on a calm lake with nothing but a clear blue sky above you. Two – you’re lying in a black velvet hammock in a pitch black room. 

“At any time when you start thinking of anything else or you start getting distracted, repeat these words for 10 seconds: ‘Don’t think, don’t think, don’t think.’” 

Agustin claims that one can perfect this technique by practicing it every night for no less than six weeks, saying: “Apparently, 96 percent of people who mastered this technique are actually able to fall asleep within two minutes of shutting their eyes.” 

A number of commenters vouched for the technique, with one claiming: “I’m a military brat and was taught this. I also had a veteran as a psychology teacher in college who taught this. it definitely works.” 

Another said: “I didn’t know this was a military thing. A college prof told me about this. I fall asleep before I reach my feet.”

While a third commented: “We learned this at summer camp back in the late 70s. I love it.”

However, one commenter wryly noted: “Tik Tok don’t help either.”

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]

Continue Reading

Good News

In World First, Man Receives Heart Transplanted From Gene-Hacked Pig

Published

on

Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

In a groundbreaking world first, a 57-year-old man in the U.S. has become the first person in the world to receive a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig.

The revolutionary procedure’s apparent success offers hope to hundreds of thousands of people who are struggling with failing vital organs amid scarce supplies of human organs.

The patient, David Bennett of Maryland, is in good shape days after the experimental seven-hour operation took place in Baltimore on Friday, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

The surgical procedure is the result of years of fervent efforts by researchers to develop pigs whose organs would be compatible with the human body, and was made possible by recent advances in gene editing and cloning technology. The heart transplant was preceded months ago by a successful kidney transplant in New York which also used an organ harvested from a genetically engineered pig.

“This is a watershed event,” said David Klassen, chief medical officer at the United Network for Organ Sharing, reports New York Times. “Doors are starting to open that will lead, I believe, to major changes in how we treat organ failure.”

The University of Maryland doctors received a special dispensation from regulators to carry out the procedure due to the fact that Bennett’s death was certain in the absence of a transplant.

Surgeon Bartley Griffith, who took part in the transplant, expressed pride in taking part in bringing the world “one step closer to solving the organ shortage crisis,” reports BBC. Roughly 17 people die every day in the U.S. while awaiting transplants, which are in extremely short supply.

“People die all the time on the waiting list, waiting for organs. If we could use genetically engineered pig organs they’d never have to wait, they could basically get an organ as they needed it,” said Christine Lau, Department of Surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

“Plus, we wouldn’t have to fly all over the country at night-time to recover organs to put them into recipients.”

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]

Continue Reading

Trending

The Mind Unleashed