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Chinese Doctor Who Was Silenced for Warning About Coronavirus Has Died From the Virus

Wuhan Central Hospital has officially announced the death of whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang.

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UPDATE — TMU initially reported that Chinese doctor Li Wenliang, who blew the whistle on the novel coronavirus back in December and was later arrested by authorities in China, had died as a result of contracting the virus after Chinese state media reported his death, causing an uproar on the Chinese social media platform Weibo. Corporate media quickly picked up the story and ran with it, clearly communicating that Li was a victim of 2019-nCoV.

However, Wuhan Central Hospital quickly denied reports of Li’s death, claiming he was still alive but in critical condition. It has now been revealed that the hospital and Chinese state media walked back on the initial report and ordered the deceased doctor be put back on life support in an attempt to control the narrative, after seeing the reaction on Weibo. U.S. corporate media immediately took note and changed their headlines and reports to fall in line with what Chinese state media was reporting. Almost instantly TMU was inundated with comments on our social media platforms labeling this article as fake news.

It appears that not long after, Chinese officials became aware that their efforts to control the narrative failed and again walked back on their reports. After confirming his death, yet again, corporate media changed their headlines and their reports yet again.

BBC’s Ross Atkins explained what happened:

This series of events is an excellent example of what independent media outlets like the Mind Unleashed deal with on a daily basis, albeit on a larger and more urgent scale. Fact checkers on social media platforms like Facebook are scanning our content daily looking for details they can flag as false, thus forcing us to jump through hoops to remove these strikes that inhibit our readers from seeing our content in their feeds. But today’s reporting on Dr. Li Wenliang showed us that news consumers are now acting as fact checkers themselves. The fake news scare has been so successful that readers are buying into the “if you see something, say something” marketing ploy resulting in comments and reports at the behest of the establishment narrative.

What this experience also showed was that U.S. corporate media is more than willing to report whatever China’s government and state media reports as fact despite a wealth of evidence that China’s government censors and issues false information in order to keep a tight grip on their preferred narrative. In the midst of a deadly pandemic is not the time to blindly trust reports from a not typically trustworthy source. In the midst of a deadly pandemic is the time to use resources and people power to investigate and search for hard proof. Unfortunately independent media does not have the same resources as corporate media giants but we do have a strong enough set of morals to not simply parrot the establishment narrative and flip flop our headlines simply because another country’s state media does.

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(TMU) — Despite early praise from the World Health Organization (WHO) for China on their response to the recent novel coronavirus outbreak, the Chinese government is facing increasing backlash for its treatment of whistleblowers and journalists sharing news about the illness.

For public health situations such as this, the Chinese government has a strict bureaucracy in place to ensure that any information or direction comes directly from the authorities, which means that anyone sharing information different from official statements is considered a risk to national “harmony” or “security.”

Li Wenliang, a 34-year-old doctor working in Wuhan, was among the first of these whistleblowers who attempted to get the word out about the virus before it spread throughout the country. Today, global media reports have indicated that Li is the most recent victim of the virus, having just passed away after contracting 2019-nCoV.

The doctor first learned about the virus in late December when seven patients came through his hospital with a “SARS-like illness” and were subsequently quarantined.

The doctor sent out a post in his medical school alumni group on the Chinese messaging app WeChat about the situation, telling his friends to be careful. Screenshots of the post quickly went viral across WeChat before reaching global social media.

On January 3rd, Li and a few other medics at the hospital were arrested by the Wuhan police for rumor-mongering.

After an intense interrogation, Police allowed Li to return to home and to work after signing a statement promising not to commit further “unlawful acts.”

This doctor tried to save lives, but was silenced. Now he has coronavirus

This Wuhan doctor was targeted by police for trying to blow the whistle on the deadly coronavirus in the early weeks of the outbreak.Then, after treating a patient who had the virus, he caught it too.https://cnn.it/2u9heUZ

Posted by CNN on Tuesday, February 4, 2020

By January 12, just over a week after he was interrogated, Li was hospitalized and was suspected of having the virus. However, he did not test positive for the virus until February 1, after being hospitalized for nearly an entire month. Less than a week later, on February 6, he was reported to have died.

Li’s death is as tragic as it is concerning given that he was a young and healthy adult—not the typical immunocompromised cases we expect to see from something that people have been comparing to the flu—and was battling the virus on the frontlines.

One of the few U.S. citizens being vocal about their experience in quarantined Wuhan, being evacuated from China, and their resulting quarantine in the U.S. has expressed her suspicions about the situation on Twitter.

https://twitter.com/plantsNbabes/status/1225460458628345856

https://twitter.com/plantsNbabes/status/1225462963244433409

The official number of confirmed cases is around 28,275 at time of publishing, with a vast majority of those cases being confirmed in China. A total of 565 deaths have been reported with all but two having occurred in China.

Just moments ago, Wuhan Central Hospital denied reports of Li Wenliang’s death and claimed he was still alive but in critical condition.

By John Vibes | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com

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Awesome New Infrared Goggles Could Help Blind People ‘See’ Surroundings

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People who are blind or deal with low vision face a unique number of challenges in their daily lives, ranging from accessing published material to holding a job or living on one’s own.

However, emerging infrared technology under research could help the blind and visually impaired navigate the world around them using a pair of innovative goggles.

In new research recently published and yet to be peer-reviewed, Manuel Zahn and Armaghan Ahmad Khan at Germany’s Technical University of Munich explored how their 3D camera and haptic feedback armband can assist people with low vision.

“Even in the present era, visually impaired people face a constant challenge of navigation,” the pair wrote. “The most common tool available to them is the cane. Although the cane allows good detection of objects in the user’s immediate vicinity, it lacks the ability to detect obstacles further away.”

The two students’ design deploys two infrared cameras placed in a 3D-printed goggles prototype to get a stereoscopic view that is transformed by a small computer into a map of the user’s surroundings. The infrared gear also works in the dark. The armband then uses 25 actuators arranged in a grid that vibrates when users come close to objects while also assisting them in their orientation. As users walk near obstacles, the vibration intensity of the actuators increases.

In tests, subjects enjoyed roughly 98 percent accuracy while getting through obstacle pathways, with all five participants completing the course in their first run. After two additional runs, the volunteers were able to navigate the obstacles more rapidly.

Zahn and Khan frequently cited Microsoft’s Kinect motion detection system for the Xbox in their study, but the pair are confident that their own setup will be far smaller, cheaper and less conspicuous than the gaming device.

The new headset could offer an interesting opportunity for blind and partially sighted people to clear the myriad obstacles they face when performing regular tasks or navigating the world around them.

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Toddler Goes On $2000 Furniture-Shopping Spree On Mom’s Phone

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A New Jersey mom learned that keeping your browser open may not be the best idea as children, and even infants, become increasingly tech savvy.

Madhu Kumar was browsing Walmart’s furniture selection on their website and had added some items to her shopping cart but never checked out. She was shocked and confused when she started to receive a steady stream of packages from the big-box retailer.

Madhu immediately turned to her husband and two older children to find out who ordered the packages.

“I need one or two, why would we need four?” Madhu asked.

As it turned out, her toddler Ayaansh Kumar – who, at 22 months old, was barely learning to count – had gone on a $2,000 shopping spree while playing on his mother’s phone.

“It is really hard to believe that he has done this, but that’s what happened,” Ayaansh’s dad, Pramod Kumar, told NBC New York.

Among the packages were some that could barely be squeezed through the family’s front door at their home in Monmouth Junction.

Purchases included accent chairs, flower stands and a range of other household items that arrived throughout the week.

“He’s so little, he’s so cute, we were laughing that he ordered all this stuff,” his mom remarked.

From birth, young Ayaansh had observantly watched his family members engage in a range of activities from home – including shopping, attending classes, and going to school. And as it the case for many kids of his generation, he knows the basics of operating a smartphone.

The parents are still waiting for all of the boxes to arrive so that they can return them to their local Walmart. The retailer has already told the Kumars that they are eligible for a refund, but the parents plan to save at least a few items to remind them of their son’s first e-commerce adventure.

“Moving forward, we will put tough passcodes or face recognition so when he picks up the phone he finds it in locked condition,” his father said.

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