Connect with us

Awareness

10 Vegetables You Can Easily Grow at Home All Year Round

Home gardening is making a huge comeback!

Published

on

Grow Vegetables
Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

(TMU) — As the coronavirus spreads across the United States, countless families are preparing to hunker down for what could be an indefinite amount of time. Whether it’s because of orders to “shelter-in-place,” self-quarantine, or simply our own conscience telling us it’s the right thing to do for the public good, many of us are preparing for a long stay at home.

With store shelves being stripped bare by panicked shoppers and many of our work hours—if not our entire jobs—being cut back due to the crisis, food security has suddenly become an issue, not only for our households but for our communities as well.

Because of this, home gardening could likely make a big comeback. Just as past generations of Americans responded to World Wars I & II with “victory gardens” at home, current generations could be set to revive the practice of planting, harvesting, and eating our own food. If anything, CoViD-19 could help us become reacquainted with some better habits when it comes to not just hygiene but general nutrition and self-sufficiency.

Here are just a few plants that can easily be grown in a small apartment or home.

1. Herbs

Whether you’re living in a sprawling condo or a tiny studio apartment, growing and harvesting herbs is supremely easy. Foodies who aren’t keen on blowing their hard-earned dollars on spices at Whole Foods can easily grow little pots of basil, mint, ginger, cilantro, parsley, or rosemary at home. All you need is a nice sunny spot on your window sill or fire escape and a bit of regular watering, and you’ll soon have fresh herbs in every meal!

2. Kale

Don’t let the price-tag fool you! While kale may be a trendy item at health food stores and restaurants, the plant is surprisingly easy to grow indoors—even during the colder months!

However, of key importance is to sow the seeds a bit farther apart than normal to allow the kale plants adequate room for growth. Within a week, you’ll soon see your kale sprouting! And then it’s only a matter of time before you’re baking kale chips, drinking kale smoothies, and enjoying a healthy kale salad!

3. Carrots

Carrots can be a super fun vegetable for beginners to grow indoors because anyone can help keep a steady level of moisture in the soil, it’s not too hard!  Carrots also come in a dazzling array of different types—from the common Imperator to the dozens of varieties of the reddish, crunchy Nantes—that can all be grown indoors and aren’t always easily found at local markets.

All you’ll need is a 12-inch pot, soil, and a sunny window, and you’re all set to be on your way to harvesting some nutritious and tasty carrots!

4. Bell Peppers

Growing bell peppers indoors can help one gain proper control of the growing environment, which in turn produces stunning peppers. Bell peppers also have a nice and long indoor growing season, which means a much larger yield spanning longer periods of time.

5. Mushrooms

Mushrooms are one of nature’s gifts to our pantry, mainly because the low-calorie fungi are very healthy as well as tasty, high in fiber, and chock full of healthy potassium.

Growing them at home is extremely easy and because they grow in dark, moist environments, they can be grown by anyone just about anywhere. It takes about 4.5 weeks to grow mushies from start to plate, and there are few things as fun as picking the little guys and eating them in the same day.

6. Beets

Beets are a brilliantly colorful addition to any plate, but they also pack a strong nutritional power-punch of vitamins and minerals. The root vegetable is perfect for beginning gardeners because they are so easy to grow indoors, and a beginning chef would do well to experiment with beet dishes—be it a satisfying Russian borscht soup or some nice beet pickles.

7. Potatoes

Growing potatoes is one of the easiest things you could do, whether you are growing them in a large basket, a big bucket, or even in a plastic sack. But when you’re growing them, leave some empty space at the top so you can dump some fresh compost in and help the root veggie develop.

8. Micro greens

Micro greens are delicious super-foods, tiny green plants that are packed with flavor and normally cost an arm and a leg at the local supermarket. But they’re also very easy to grow at home with a few basic supplies, a bit of sunlight, and a small container. It takes only 2 to 3 short weeks from planting to harvesting before you can have a plateful of healthy micro greens.

9. Onions

Onions are awesome to grow indoors in decorative pots or water dishes because not only do they not take up much space or require direct sunlight, but they naturally re-sprout. What this means is that you can grow new onions from seeds, or you can take your old onion scraps and sprout new onions, ensuring that your kitchen never goes without fresh bulbs.

10. Garlic

Like onions, garlic is a re-sprouting plant that can be harvested year-round to ensure that you always have the tasty plant in your kitchen. You can also trim the shoots of the garlic bulb to use in soups, pizzas, or as a delicious garnish! Just get some good garlic from a nursery or online, break up the bulbs, and plant your biggest cloves. Soon you’ll see the green shoots of the plant, which are also edible, and after 10 months you’ll have some delicious homegrown garlic!

By Elias Marat | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]

Awareness

UK Queen’s Statues Torn Down Amid Anger Over Mass Graves for Indigenous Children

Published

on

Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

This year may have had one of the most muted Canada Day celebrations, but this didn’t stop Indigenous protesters from making their anger felt – especially in the wake of the discovery of over 1,000 children’s bodies near the residential schools run by the Canadian state and church authorities.

And with churches being likely targeted by arsonists for the crimes of Catholic clergy, protesters are now attacking the symbols of Anglo colonialism – namely, statues of Queen Elizabeth and Queen Victoria.

More than 200 children’s bodies were discovered buried in a mass grave in May, with several hundreds more being discovered in June at unmarked gravesites near Indian residential schools in June.

About 150,000 First Nations children were forcibly separated from their families and communities and forced to attend the religious schools which were established in the 19th century to assimilate Indigenous children into the Anglo settler-colonial culture of Canada.

Former students have testified to the horrific sexual, mental and physical abuse they suffered while enrolled at the schools. Myriad children died from preventable diseases, as well as in accidents and fires. Others disappeared when trying to escape. The Commission has denounced the schools for institutionalizing child neglect and for being organs of “cultural genocide.”

The discoveries have churned up deep-seated anguish and memories of the suffering visited upon First Nations peoples, with many lashing out at the symbols of colonialism.

At least seven churches, all but one of which were Catholic, have also come under apparent arson attacks throughout Canada in recent weeks.

In June, a statue of the late Pope John Paul II at a Catholic church in Edmonton was splattered with red paint and red handprints.

On Thursday, July 1, residents in Canada also held organized protests and pulled down the statues of the top figurehead of British colonialism: Queen Elizabeth II, as well as that of her great grandmother, Queen Victoria. Sky News reports that the toppling of the statues was accompanied by the chant, “No Pride in Genocide!”

In Ottawa, protestors gathered en masse at Parliament Hill chanting ”Cancel Canada Day” and ”shame on Canada,” urging an end to the national holiday over the deaths of Indigenous people.

Indigenous groups and Canadian politicians are demanding an apology from the Catholic Church – specifically Pope Francis. The event could take place by year’s end, according to the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops.

However, it remains unlikely that the British crown will offer the same amends to Canada’s Indigenous nations who, like many across the globe, suffered greatly in British Colonialism’s worldwide search for riches and glory.

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]

Continue Reading

Awareness

3 Reasons Why Introverts Are Undervalued in Today’s Society

Published

on

introverts undervalued society
Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

It’s undeniable that our society favors assertive extroverted personalities with strong communication skills and underestimates the quiet ones. If you are an introvert, you have probably learned it the hard way.

It could be that you felt unseen in the classroom as a child or teen. Or you may have watched your less competent co-workers get a promotion thanks to their social skills.

It feels unfair, but if you think about our society, it makes perfect sense. The consumerist mindset that has become our second nature inevitably affects the way we treat other people. It seems that everything, including our personal qualities and worth as human beings, is translated into some kind of market value.

In other words, to make other people see your worth in personal or professional life, you need to be able to ‘sell yourself’. Yes, this expression alone tells it all.

You need to know how to make a good first impression, say the right things, and be assertive. If you can’t do it, you are perceived as incapable and uninteresting – whether we are talking about a job interview or an informal social gathering.

But it’s not the only reason why introverts are undervalued in our society. Here are a few more:

1. They are less efficient in teamwork

Communication and teamwork skills are required for all kinds of jobs. It seems that without being able to work in a team, it’s impossible to do your job even if your duties don’t involve interaction with clients.

Introverts are much more efficient when they work on their own and are given a certain extent of independence. They thrive in quiet environments with few distractions and interactions. This is when a quiet person gets the chance to unleash their creative self and make good use of their analytical skills.

Most office jobs don’t give employees this opportunity. Office meetings, group projects, phone calls and all the other attributes of a 9-to-5 job make it almost impossible for an introvert to be productive.

2. They don’t like to be in the spotlight

Sometimes it feels like we are living in a society of attention seekers. Today, you are expected to go public about the most personal matters, such as your relationship and family life.

People share their most intimate thoughts and feelings on social media, post updates about the most trivial events, such as what they had for dinner, and upload countless selfies.

Introverts are among those who still value privacy. They are less likely to showcase their lives online or share the details of their personal affairs with the whole world.

At the same time, the quiet ones don’t like to be in the spotlight at social events. An introvert will never interrupt you. They will listen to you and talk only when they have something important to say. This tendency to avoid attention can be mistaken for insecurity and even a lack of intelligence.

3. They prefer to be real than to be ‘nice’

If you want to make a good impression on others, you are expected to be nice. But what does it mean to be ‘nice’ anyway?

In an introvert’s mind, it equals saying things you don’t mean. Quiet personalities will never bombard you with compliments or say meaningless social pleasantries just to win your fondness. But if an introvert said something nice to you, then be sure that they truly meant it.

Small talk is another component of social relationships most introverts struggle with. To them, it embodies utterly dull, uncomfortable, and pointless conversations they can perfectly do without. For this reason, introverts are often mistakenly believed to hate people.

The truth is that they don’t – they just crave stimulating, meaningful conversations and choose their social circle more carefully than extroverts.

In my book, The Power of Misfits: How to Find Your Place in a World You Don’t Fit In, I write about the reasons why so many introverts feel inadequate and alienated from other people in today’s society. It all goes down to social expectations this personality type has to deal with from a very early age.

But the good news is that every introvert can overcome the negative effects of these expectations and find the right path in this loud, extroverted world.

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]

Continue Reading

Trending

The Mind Unleashed