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4.5 Million Flowers Bloom Across Japanese Park Like a Never-Ending Sea of Blue Lights

The stunning 8.6 acre landscape is covered by 4.5 million flowers nicknamed “baby blue eyes.”

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Baby Blue Eyes
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(TMU) — When flowers bloom in Japan, they do so seriously, beautifully and in abundance.

An important part of Japanese culture, each season’s unique species and varieties seem to just burst with pride to show their blooms and bring happiness to the people. Large flower fields are found all over Japan, some private farmer-owned and others government-owned tourist attractions. Both local and international tourists love to travel and enjoy the spectacle each season brings.

A sight not to be missed for those visiting Japan, the Hitachi Seaside Park near Mito in the Ibaraki Prefecture offers many varieties of seasonal flowers and other attractions such as an amusement park and several cycling and walking trails spread over 190 acres.

Those who have experienced the glorious display of Nemophila Harmony in bloom attest to late April to mid-May being one of the best times to visit the park.

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気持ちの良い青空。 つづら折の道が空へと続いているようでした。 みはらしの丘のネモフィラは現在<見頃(7分咲き)>です。 ※新型コロナウイルス感染症の更なる感染拡大防止のため、臨時休園しております。 当アカウントでは、 #ひたち海浜公園と私 をつけて投稿していただいた方のお写真もご紹介していきます。たくさんのご投稿をお待ちしております。 #ひたち海浜公園#hitachiseasidepark#茨城#花好きな人と繋がりたい#花のある暮らし#igで繋がる空#花部#写真好きな人と繋がりたい#ファインダー越しの私の世界#茨城カメラ部#茨城フォト倶楽部#誰かに見せたい風景#ネモフィラ#nemophila#みはらしの丘#家で過ごそう#StayHome#ひたち海浜公園と私#art_of_japan_ #team_jp_#iGersJP#reco_ig#good_portraits_world#daily_photo_jpn#best photo_japan#jp_mood#love_bestjapan#ibarakiphotoclub#northoftokyo

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Nicknamed the “baby blue eyes,” 8.6 acres of Miharashi hills are covered by 4.5 million Nemophilia flowers. We’re not sure how they counted them all but that’s a serious number of flowers! Except for the pathways, they cover every inch of the hills like an exquisite carpet and no matter at which point of the walkways you find yourself, you’ll have an amazing, picture-perfect view every time.

Considering the current world-wide coronavirus pandemic, the park was closed on April 4 until further notice. So while you won’t be able to visit in Spring 2020, perhaps this video of the Hitachi Seaside Park will brighten your day in the meantime and wet your appetite for a future visit.

You can easily grow your own fields of baby blue eyes (Nemophila Menziesii). This annual is a hardy, low-spreading shrub with succulent stems and is easy to maintain.

The baby blue eyes should do well in USDA hardiness zones 2-10. Although they don’t need fertilizer once they grow, a little added to the soil before planting the seeds will help with growth. Plant the seeds in early spring where they’ll have partial shade and some wind protection.

Give them plenty of water during the first six weeks of germination and then cut down on watering when they bloom.

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Gisteren introduceerden we het Hitachi Seaside Park. Het speciale aan dit park is dat het niet alleen leuk is om te bezoeken in de lente, maar het hele jaar door! ⠀⠀⁠ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⁠ Zo groeien er in de lente deze bosliefjes, ook wel nemophila genoemd, die je op de foto ziet. In de zomer bloeien de zonnebloemen, in de herfst de cosmos bloemen en in de winter kan je prachtige ice cream tulpen vinden. En dit is alleen nog maar een kleine selectie! 🌷 ⠀⠀⁠ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⁠ #hitachiseasidepark #japan #bloemen #travel #discoverjapan #japanreizen #explorejapan #japantrip #rondreis #visitjapan #japantravel #instatravel #reizen #travelgram #photooftheday #vakantie #reisinspiratie #reisblogger #reisfotografie #wanderlust

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When your baby blue blooms, you’ll be rewarded with plenty of beautiful flowers whose petals mostly cover the stems and green leaves. Because the Nemophila are not around for long enough, pests and disease are usually not a problem, although if planted in early spring they should bloom through summer and attract butterflies and bees to your garden.

By Jade Small | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com

Animals

As Marine Life Flees the Equator, Global Mass Extinction is Imminent: Scientists

Elias Marat

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The waters surrounding the equator are one of the most biodiverse areas in the globe, with the tropical area rich in marine life including rare sea turtles, whale sharks, manta rays, and other creatures.

However, rampant rises in temperate have led to a mass exodus of marine species from the sensitive region – with grave implications for life on earth.

While ecologists have long seen the thriving biodiversity of equatorial species holding constant in the past few centuries, a new study by Australian researchers published in The Conversation has found that warming global temperatures are now hitting the equator hard, potentially leading to an unprecedented mass extinction event.

The researchers from the Universities of Auckland, Queensland, and the Sunshine Coast found that as waters surrounding the equator continue to heat up, the ecosystem is being disrupted and forcing species to flee toward the cooler water of the South and North Pole.

The massive changes in marine ecosystems that this entails will have a grave impact not only on ocean life – essentially becoming invasive species in their new homes –  but also on the human livelihoods that depend on it.

“When the same thing happened 252 million years ago, 90 percent of all marine species died,” the researchers wrote.

To see where marine life is headed, the researchers tracked the distribution of about 49,000 different species to see what their trajectory was. The global distribution of ocean life typically resembles a bell curve, with far fewer species near the poles and more near the equator.

However, the vast alteration of the curve is already in motion as creatures flee to the poles, according to a study they published in the journal PNAS.

These changes augur major disruptions to global ecosystem as marine life scrambles in a chaotic fight for food, space, and resources – with a mass die-off and extinction of creatures likely resulting.

The research underscores the dire need for human societies to control rampant climate change before the biodiversity and ecological health of the planet is pushed past the point of no return.

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Environment

Japan Says Dumping Fukushima Radioactive Water in Pacific Ocean is Now “Unavoidable”

Elias Marat

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While Japan last month marked the 10th anniversary of the devastating 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami with solemn ceremonies, the government has also been stressing the successes of its recovery efforts in the country’s northeast.

In truth, however, the country is still coping with the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster, which has already cost Japan trillions of yen and whose exclusion zone will require up to 40 more years to fully rehabilitate.

And with contaminated water continuing to build up at the ruined Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga says that the government must finally begin dumping it into the Pacific Ocean.

With nuclear waste and fuel rods still contaminating the area, over one million tons of radioactive waste water continue to seep from the facility, according to The Japan Times, forcing authorities into what Suga describes as the “unavoidable” position of having to dump the water.

Officials claim that the water would be purified to the maximum extent possible, but environmentalist groups like Greenpeace warn that the water contains hazardous material that could damage human DNA and the health of marine life.

Fishers also fear that consumers will refuse to buy fish caught in contaminated waters, worsening their plight amid a restriction of imports from Fukushima prefecture imposed by 15 countries and regions.

Regardless, authorities argue they must deal with the cards that have been dealt.

“What to do with the [treated] water is a task that the government can no longer put off without setting a policy,” Japanese trade minister Hiroshi Kajiyama said on Wednesday.

Suga is expected to formally decide on the course of action by next Tuesday. If he proceeds, authorities will dilute tritium to 2.5 percent of the maximum concentration allowed by the country before it is dumped.

But while Japanese officials say that the water will be safe, it remains an open question whether people will trust their word.

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Environment

Crowds Flock to Lava-Spewing Volcanoes in Italy, Iceland and Guatemala to Get Closer View

Elias Marat

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The year 2021 has so far been a particularly active time for volcanic eruptions. In February and March, three spectacular volcanic eruptions have occurred: the Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland, Mount Etna in Italy and Pacaya in Guatemala.

In each case, the eruptions have drawn large crowds of curious onlookers and sightseers.

In vivid video captured at Fagradalsfjall volcano on April 1, lava can be seen being spewed as amazed onlookers can be heard in the background. According to local reports, tens of thousands of people have been drawn to the area to view the eruption.

Iceland’s authorities are not anticipating evacuations due to the mile-and-a-half distance from the nearest road.

“We are monitoring the situation closely and as of now it is not considered a threat to surrounding towns,” said Iceland Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir. “We ask people to keep away from the immediate area and stay safe.”

Italy and Guatemala have also experienced a few volcanic eruptions this year.

On March 7, Sicilian villages were showered with ash and lava stone following the eruption of Mount Etna, which began its highly active phase in February.

The Pacaya volcano lying 30 miles south of the Guatemalan capital has also been extremely active since February.

Pacaya’s peak typically attracts tourists, but hikes are temporarily on hold due to the uptick in activity. Pacaya has a clear view of the nearby Volcano of Fire, whose lava flows in a 2018 eruption killed at least 110 people and left rougly 200 missing.

While volcano tourism provides a steady source of income for villages like nearby San Francisco de Sales, locals must balance this with the need to ensure their long-term safety.

So far, however, Pacaya has not yet injured locals.

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