Meet The White-Browed Tit-Warbler, The Bird With A Beautiful Rainbow Coloring

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(TMU) – While many bird species have amazing bright, jewel colored plumage, such as Blue Jays, Peacocks and Sunbirds, the white-browed tit-warbler has a multi-colored body, with a light brown crown and light colored eyebrow.

The white-browed tit-warbler (Leptopoecile sophiae) is a species within the family of Aegithalidae (Bushtits) and first described by Nikolai Severtzov in 1873.

The white-browed tit-warbler is small, weighing between 0.21–0.28oz (6–8g) and between 3.3–3.9in (8.5–10cm) long. The rear and upper tail-coverts are violet blue and both males and females have a light brown crown and white supercilium (eyebrow) and a relatively long tale.

The male has plumage of vibrant colors, with distinctive blue-mauve underparts and chest. The plumage of females are usually duller, and distinguishable from the males by their pale underparts.

Posted by The Rabbit Hole on Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Native to the Himalayas, the Tibetan Plateau, Russia, and much of Northwest China, the white-browed tit-warbler prefers dry mountainous shrub land between 6,600–16,400 feet (2,000–5,000m) and tend to move to lower elevations in winter.

The white-browed tit-warbler forage for insects under roots and rocks.

Posted by The Rabbit Hole on Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Like several other bird species, these birds are monogamous and their first mating partner they choose will be their partner for life. Breeding usually start early April to July. The pair build their dome shaped nest together in shrubs about 3ft (0.9m).

Typically, four to six eggs are laid and incubated over an average of 20.5 days. The parents share nesting duty and the chicks reach fledgling stage after about 17 days.

Posted by The Rabbit Hole on Tuesday, June 9, 2020

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) lists the species under ‘least concern’ on the red list, largely due to the bird’s natural habitat at high elevation and cold regions where feral cats, usually a natural predator, would prefer not to go hunting.

Posted by The Rabbit Hole on Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Much like the feral cats, unless you’re a keen hiker to high places and love the cold way up near the clouds, chances are you’ll be just be happily enjoying the photographs of these rainbow birds from the comfort of home.