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Trump Planning Blitz of Rallies and Lawsuits in Last-Gasp Fight to Flip Election Results

President Donald Trump is planning on using his final weeks in the White House to hold a series of large-scale rallies.

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President Donald Trump is planning on using his final weeks in the White House to hold a series of large-scale rallies focused on whipping up his base and galvanizing support for what he hopes will be a protracted, long-shot legal fight to overturn his defeat in the presidential election, according to reports.

One Trump campaign official Fox News confirmed that the rallies are being planned, but that the president himself would likely not attend them. They “would be grassroots events similar to the boat parades, not presidential rallies.”

On Sunday Axios reported that the president’s campaign team hopes to publish obituaries of dead people who allegedly still voted in the 2020 election, as members of the Trump family and various Republicans have claimed.

While Trump’s team hasn’t yet provided proof of a single instance of Democrats using dead people to ostensibly “steal” votes from Trump, it is unlikely that if these alleged dead voters are produced, they will be able to nullify the victory of President-elect Joe Biden. Despite this, the president’s team plans to then take this proof of election fraud to “a series of Trump rallies” similar to those held during his reelection campaign.

Viral social media claims about the deceased supposedly casting ballots in battleground states like Michigan began to spread throughout the internet the day after Election Day. In one such video, right-wing political activist Austen Fletcher – known by his online pseudonym “Fleccas” – can be seen searching for a voter named William Bradley who was born in March 1902.

“Turns out 118-year-old ‘William Bradley’ voted via absentee ballot in Wayne County, Michigan,” Fletcher wrote in a tweet. “How long has this been going on?” he added.

As it turns out, public records show that his son who is also named William Bradley, is alive and lives at the home that once belonged to his father.

Trump administration officials have also denied claims of mass voter fraud or illegal voting, despite the president himself making such allegations. According to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, a federal agency overseeing election security in the U.S., local election offices have detection measures that “make it highly difficult to commit fraud through counterfeit ballots.”

Election officials in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Nevada have likewise said that they have not seen widespread voting irregularities or major instances of fraud or illegal activity, reports Fox News.

Trump’s plans to contest the results of the election hit a snag Monday after it was revealed that Daryl Brooks, one of the key witnesses alleging vote-counting fraud in Pennsylvania, is a convicted child sex offender.

The revelations come as reports continue to spill out of the White House about splits within the Trump family and extended inner circle about what course to take after Democratic challenger Joe Biden was declared president-elect on Saturday.

According to the Axios report, some forces within the Trump camp are hoping to convice the outgoing president that he should abandon a strategy of launching a salvo of legal actions, with Rudy Giuliani at the lead, while Biden continues to beat the drum of national unity, healing, and coming together in the aftermath of the hotly-contested election.

However, a senior Republican who is in frequent touch with Trump claims that the president is “angry … volatile … disconsolate” and in no mood to concede anything.

According to these reports, advisers and people close to Trump would like to see the president gracefully concede and take up the role of being a central Republican Party figure or “kingmaker,” with he or one of his children running for office again in 2024.

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