Epigenetics is an emerging science that mainstream biologists and medical professionals have largely ignored. It details how our environment can deeply change a human being for the better or worse. Bruce Lipton, PhD has talked about the fact that our health is not controlled by genes for many years, but now, a scientific experiment has proven that the archaic understanding that genes determine reality is largely untrue.

Lipton explains:

“Medicine does miracles, but it’s limited to trauma. The AMA protocol is to regard our physical body like a machine, in the same way that an auto mechanic regards a car. When the parts break, you replace them—a transplant, synthetic joints, and so on—and those are medical miracles.

The problem is that while they have an understanding that the mechanism isn’t working, they’re blaming the vehicle for what went wrong. They believe that the vehicle, in this case our bodies, is controlled by genes.But guess what? They don’t take into consideration that there’s actually a driver in that car. The new science, epigenetics, reveals that the vehicles—or the genes—aren’t responsible for the breakdown. It’s the driver.”

For now, mainstream medicine tells us that if we end up with cancer or heart disease, it was in our genes, and the only way to really rectify the situation is to undergo invasive, and expensive surgeries or take prescription medications which the industry makes billions on. This is a patent lie. The study of epigenetics gives us our power back as individuals – to take responsibility for our health, and to heal what mainstream medicine has not been able to heal.

Just in time to prove that Lipton isn’t inhaling fairy dust, a new study has come out that proves beyond our genetic code in a few strands of DNA, our parents pass down some very different instructions that can determine everything from our health, to whether or not we’ll tend to be a happy, upbeat individual, or prone to depression.

Research from the Medical Research Council (MRC) International Nutrition Group at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the MRC Unit in Gambia published in the journal Nature Communications provides the first proof that a mother’s diet can change the expression of genes in her unborn child.

Over 2000 pregnant women’s hair follicles and blood was sampled to determine what their diets were like just before conception. The researchers found that after comparing these samples to those taken from 2 to 8-month-old infants, the mother’s diet BEFORE conception has a significant effect on the properties of the DNA she passed down to her child.

This was observed primarily through a process known as methylation, whereupon certain regions of the genome are ‘tagged’ and placed into methyl groups. This process turns off certain gene expressions, and turns on others.

The researchers found that children conceived with a better diet had higher methylation rates. Higher methylation rates were linked to higher concentrations of important nutrients in the mother’s blood, especially homocysteine and cysteine. It was also no surprise that a poor diet led to lower methylation rates, as normal methylation requires nutrients such as choline, folate, methionine and vitamins B2, B6 and B12.

This study takes one of the most basic presumptions of medical science and turns it on its head. It was heretofore assumed that we got one half of our DNA from one parent, and one half from the other. Those 23 pairs of chromosomes were thought to be ‘God’ when it came down to what we would be like, but as we discover that humans have such similar DNA to rats, or spiders, it would make sense that something else was happening in the coding process. We share a quarter of our DNA with a grain of rice – so how could it be possible that all our potential was wrapped up in a few base pairs?

Even after mapping out 3.2 billion base pairs of DNA in the human genome project, we were none the wiser in understanding aberrant DNA. Might it not be in the way we think? In the foods we eat? In the people we choose to spend our time with?

To scientists like Rupert Sheldrake, the noted biologist and author of over 80 scientific papers, this is of course possible. It is indeed the reality of form in the resonant field.

Sheldrake explains how epigenetics works in his own words:

Morphic resonance is a process whereby self-organising systems inherit a memory from previous similar systems. In its most general formulation, morphic resonance means that the so-called laws of nature are more like habits. The hypothesis of morphic resonance also leads to a radically new interpretation of memory storage in the brain and of biological inheritance. Memory need not be stored in material traces inside brains, which are more like TV receivers than video recorders, tuning into influences from the past.”

If, as Lipton and Sheldrake believe, the resonant energy of our field determines who we are, then of course eating higher-vibration food, listening to higher-vibrating music, and sharing ideas with more positive people will change our genes. There is no cancer without the consciousness that created it. It isn’t locked in our genes, as the current medical establishment would have us believe. Finding health and happiness can be as simple as eating more broccoli and putting on some Bob Marley on the way to work. Our genes are paying attention to those ‘codes.’

The latest research looking into the epigenetic effect of diet on an unborn child helps us to understand just how powerful we are to direct change. Other studies have suggested a similar fate.

For example, Dr. Linda E. Carlson and her colleagues found that in breast cancer patients, support group involvement and mindfulness meditation – meditation where practitioners focused on thoughts and actions in a non-judgmental way, ignoring past grudges and future concerns — changed telomere length.

Telomeres are stretches of DNA that cap our chromosomes and help prevent chromosomal deterioration. Shortened telomeres aren’t known to cause a specific disease per se, but they do wither with age and are shorter in people with cancer, diabetes, heart disease and high stress levels. We want our telomeres intact. If we can affect this important part of our DNA with just a few meditative sessions, what else is possible?

No offense to Charles Darwin, considered the father of modern biology, but he didn’t know squat about the morphic field, and the ways we can direct our own DNA to be healthier, with entirely different outcomes than materialistic science might have assumed. We can change our DNA. Epigenetics has proven it.