US Air Force Warns of Angry Men Who Can’t Get Laid

(TMU) — The U.S. Air Force is warning its personnel on at least one military base about a new threat to keep a watch out for: frustrated males who can’t get laid.

Joint Base Andrews in Maryland recently held a threat briefing concerning Incels—the online subculture of men who are angry about their involuntary celibacy. As a result of their sexual aggravation, these men are said to embrace an anti-woman philosophy.

The Air Force amn/nco/snco Facebook page posted a screenshot of a document used in the briefing that describes how these Incels view females.

A spokesperson for the Air Force confirmed the authenticity of the screenshot to the website Task & Purpose.

“The screenshot was taken from a Joint Base Andrews Intel brief created following basic threat analysis on an increase in nationwide activity by the group,” 11th Wing spokesman Aletha Frost told the web publication via email. “The intent of the brief was to educate the Joint Base Andrews commanders on the behaviors and activities attributed to the group to safeguard our Airmen/installation.”

According to the briefing:

Incels believe they are owed attention from ‘Beckys’. Most Incels believe only men can be Incels as women could engage in sexual activity if they wanted to.”

A popular internet meme used in the briefing is called “Becky vs. Stacy.” The meme is meant to describe how the Incels purportedly judge women based solely on their appearance.

The briefing also states:

“The majority of Incel online activity falls under First Amendment protected speech. Following the Toronto attack, there was an increase in discussion of conducting a variety of attacks. Members primarily use online forums such as 4Chan, 8Chan, Incel.me, and Reddit.”

The Toronto attack referred to is an incident from April 2018 involving a van attack that left 10 dead. Alek Minassian, the 25-year-old responsible for the atrocity, stated on social media that he hoped to incite an “Incel rebellion.”

Other examples of Incels committing violence include when 22-year-old Elliot Rodger shot and killed six women in Isla Vista, California after years of romantic rejection.

In 2018, 40-year-old Scott Beierle killed two women in a Tallahassee, Florida yoga studio. Beierle “was an avowed hater of women, a man who repeatedly grabbed women in real life and fantasized about raping and killing them in the horrific collection of lyrics, poetry and novels he began writing as a teenager,” according to a Washington Post investigation.

In January 2019, Christopher Wayne Cleary, 27, was arrested on terrorism charges following Facebook posts threatening a mass shooting over his virginity. “I’m planning on shooting up a public place soon and being the next mass shooter cause I’m ready to die and all the girls the turned me down is going to make it right by killing as many girls as I see,” he wrote on Facebook.

By S.M. Gibson | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com