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Ghislaine Maxwell fails to block release of confidential documents and Epstein flight logs

A US District Court Judge denied Ghislaine Maxwell’s bid to prevent depositions against Maxwell and Epstein from being made public.

Elias Marat

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(TMU) – Alleged sex trafficker and British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell has failed in her last-minute bid to prevent the release of potentially explosive court documents that could publicly reveal damaging details about her criminal involvement with her late ex-boyfriend and notorious pedophile, Jeffrey Epstein.

On Wednesday, US District Court Judge Loretta Preska denied Maxwell’s bid to prevent depositions against Maxwell and Epstein from being made public.

The batch of “extremely personal, confidential” documents includes hundreds of pages that detail Maxwell’s dealings with her notorious partner, including flight logs from Epstein’s private jets, and police reports from Palm Beach, Florida, where Epstein resided.

Maxwell’s attorneys had argued that the documents are “extremely personal, confidential and subject to considerable abuse by the media,” including “intrusive” questions about her sex life, thus offering “compelling” reason for them not to be released.

Judge Preska has allowed for the deposition’s release to be delayed until Monday to allow Maxwell time to appeal their release, reports CNN.

The documents are related to Epstein accuser and former “sex slave” Virginia Roberts Giuffre’s now-settled 2015 civil lawsuit against Maxwell. Giuffre sued the Maxwell for defamation after she was accused by the British socialite of fabricating the sexual abuse allegations against her and Epstein.

Maxwell was arrested earlier this month over separate allegations that she was involved with Epstein’s sex trafficking of young women and minors.

Maxwell, 58, pleaded not guilty on July 14 to assisting Epstein in the recruitment and sexual abuse of three girls in the 1990s, and of committing perjury by lying about her involvement while under oath.

Maxwell faces charges of conspiracy to entice minors to travel to engage in illegal sex acts; enticing a minor to travel to engage in illegal sex acts; conspiracy to transport minors, and transportation of a minor, with intent to engage in criminal sexual activity; and two counts of perjury.

She is accused of grooming multiple minors to engage in sex acts with Epstein by befriending them to ask them about their lives and families while building friendships with the young girls alongside Epstein by taking their victims on social outings or out shopping.

Maxwell faces up to 35 years in jail.

Maxwell’s legal team have accused Giuffre and federal prosecutors of violating a protective order from the civil case meant to keep the transcript of Maxwell’s seven-hour, 418-page deposition confidential.

Her attorneys claim that Giuffre leaked the deposition “in conjunction with the government” in hopes to set up a “perjury trap” for Maxwell.

However, Preska said that criminal probes into Epstein’s dealings and associates had already “loomed large” when Maxwell opposed unsealing the deposition in June, noting that the need for public access “is plowed ground.”

Giuffre has accused Maxwell of recruiting her to work as Epstein’s masseuse when she was only 15 years old and worked as a locker-room attendant at Donald Trump’s private Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach. She was eventually reduced to a “sex slave” of the late financier thanks to Maxwell’s assistance.

Maxwell is intensely well-connected with various members of political and business elites. Photographs have long circulated of Maxwell posing at social events with figures including Bill Clinton and Donald Trump, giving rise to public suspicion about public figures’ ties to she and Epstein.

Last Tuesday, President Trump confirmed that he knew Maxwell and expressed positive feelings about the accused child sex trafficker, confirming that he had met Maxwell “numerous times over the years, especially since I lived in Palm Beach.” The president also repeatedly said “I just wish her well.”

In her ruling last week, judge Preska said that the public has a right to know the contents of deposition and that this right far outweighs the “annoyance or embarrassment” to Maxwell.

“In the context of this case, especially its allegations of sex trafficking of young girls, the court finds any minor embarrassment or annoyance resulting from Ms. Maxwell’s mostly non-testimony … is far outweighed by the presumption of public access,” she added.

Corruption

Ex-Trump Official Who Gave Epstein Sweetheart Deal for Child Sex Crimes Is Excused by DOJ

Elias Marat

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A former member of Donald Trump’s presidential cabinet who notoriously cut Jeffrey Epstein a sweetheart deal in 2008 has been cleared of any wrongdoing by the Justice Department.

The investigation by the department’s Office of Professional Responsibility (DOJ-OPR) found that former Labor Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta – who served in Trump’s cabinet from 2017 until his 2019 resignation – had exercised “poor judgement” when arranging a 2008 plea deal for the disgraced financier and convicted sexual predator.

According to the Justice Department investigation whose findings were released Thursday, Acosta mishandled the case but didn’t break the law, reports NBC News.

The investigation found that Epstein’s victims “were not treated with the forthrightness and sensitivity expected by the department” under the deal arranged by Acosta, who was the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida at the time.

In 2019, Acosta resigned his position as head of the U.S. Department of Labor amid fallout from the Epstein case.

While serving as the top Miami prosecutor, Acosta infamously cut Epstein a non-prosecution plea deal in 2007 for charges relating to the sexual exploitation of underage girls.

Epstein had faced allegations that he sexually abused dozens of underage teen girls at his Palm Beach mansion throughout the early 2000s.

Under the agreement agreed to by Acosta – which involved him pleading guilty to state charges involving only one teenaged victim – Epstein did not face federal criminal charges and a separate federal investigation was immediately ground to a halt. The deal also sealed the indictment records.

Thanks to the plea deal, the well-connected pedophile – whose friends and associates included Donald Trump, Bill Clinton, Prince Andrew, and Bill Gates, among others – was spared a prison sentence that could have lasted several years.

While serving 13 months of his Florida jail sentence, Epstein was also granted the freedom to attend to his business affairs in his luxurious offices.

The secret deal also granted immunity to “any potential co-conspirators’’ who were also involved in Epstein’s crimes, effectively ensuring that other wealthy members of Epstein’s child rapist ring got off scot-free.

The Justice Department’s summary of the investigation noted that Acosta personally “made the pivotal decision to resolve the federal investigation of Epstein through a state-based plea and either developed or approved the terms of the initial offer to the defense that set the beginning point for the subsequent negotiations that led to the”  non-prosecution agreement (NPA).

“The NPA was a flawed mechanism for satisfying the federal interest that caused the government to open its investigation of Epstein,” the report added.

During the review, the office noted that members of Acosta’s office were concerned about “legal issues, witness credibility, and the impact of a trial on the victims” which ultimately led them to opt for the plea bargain and avoid trial.

Due to these considerations, “OPR does not find that Acosta engaged in professional misconduct by resolving the federal investigation of Epstein in the way he did or that the other subjects committed professional misconduct through their implementation of Acosta’s decisions.”

The report also noted that the former U.S. attorney’s judgment lacked transparency and left Epstein’s victims “feeling confused and ill-treated by the government.”

Victims involved in the 2008 case were briefed on the DOJ-OPR report on Thursday morning, but haven’t yet made any comment on the findings.

“Letting a well-connected billionaire get away with child rape and international sex trafficking isn’t ‘poor judgment’ – it is a disgusting failure,” said Nebraska Republican Sen. Ben Sasse in a statement. “Americans ought to be enraged.”

“Jeffrey Epstein should be rotting behind bars today, but the Justice Department failed Epstein’s victims at every turn,” Sasse added. “The DOJ’s crooked deal with Epstein effectively shut down investigations into his child sex trafficking ring and protected his co-conspirators in other states. Justice has not been served.” 

Epstein, 66, was found hanged in a lone cell in the special housing unit (SHU) of a federal prison in Manhattan while facing a potential prison sentence of up to 45 years on charges of pedophilia and sex trafficking. A city medical examiner ruled the death a suicide.

His ex-girlfriend Ghislaine Maxwell is currently being held in a New York City jail over a range of allegations related to child sex trafficking, the sexual exploitation of minors, and perjury – including that she groomed girls as young as 14 for Epstein to abuse, while also participating in the abuse. She will stand trial in July 2021.

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As Millions Face Eviction, Senate Proposes Nearly $700 Billion for Pentagon

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As millions face eviction and line up at food banks throughout the country, waiting for another stimulus payment that will seemingly never come, the Senate Appropriations Committee is proposing a $696 billion Pentagon spending bill for the upcoming fiscal year.

According to The Hill, The Senate’s version of the fiscal 2021 Pentagon spending bill was released Tuesday along with 11 other annual appropriations bills.

Both Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have said they want to pass an omnibus spending bill, and they will likely agree on the military budget, as Democrats overwhelmingly vote in favor of military spending when they have the opportunity, just as Republicans do.

In July, the House passed a $694.6 billion bill for Pentagon spending in July. The Senate version released this week includes $627.2 billion for the base defense budget and $68.7 billion for a war fund known as the Overseas Contingency Operations account, and also includes a 3% pay raise for troops.

However, the final Senate version of the bill left out a few causes that were championed by progressive Democrats, including the renaming of military bases that are named after Confederate leaders, and measures that were intended to block defense funds from being used on the border wall.

The Senate’s bill would also fund 96 F-35 fighter jets, which is an increase over the original bill and over the administration’s initial request. In addition to the fighter jets, the bill also gives the Pentagon $21.35 billion to build nine new battle force ships.

Meanwhile, millions of Americans are unemployed and many are now starting to get evicted. According to the most recent numbers there are 6.8 million, and this only accounts for the people officially collecting unemployment, this does not include the number of people who are not qualified for unemployment, or people who have been out of the work force for an extended length of time. The unemployment rate dropped slightly over the past two months, but is still at record highs.

According to estimates by the Princeton University Eviction Lab, 3.6 million people face eviction cases in a typical year. This year, up to 8 million people could be facing eviction, according to a tracking tool developed by the global advisory firm Stout Risius and Ross, which works with the nonprofit National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel.

It is also estimated that up to $32 billion in back rent will be due for tenants across the US once bans on evictions are lifted. Despite bans on evictions, many landlords in the US are still kicking people out of their homes, and in some cases, they have even challenged the eviction bans in court.

The people who are struggling financially in the US can’t count on much help from the government. Even the prospects of a new stimulus check are uncertain, and a payment will not be coming until next year at the very earliest, if it comes at all. Yet, the Pentagon is still able to claim nearly $700 billion in taxpayer money.

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Lawyers Unable to Locate Parents of 666 Migrant Children — Some Held Since They Were Under 5

Elias Marat

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Lawyers trying to reunite migrant families have been unable to locate the parents of 666 children separated by the Trump administration, over 100 more than they had previously believed.

The children were torn from their parents before and during President Donald Trump’s controversial “zero tolerance” policy at the southern border, where migrants were prosecuted and imprisoned under all migration-related offenses.

While attorneys had reported to a federal judge in October that the parents of 545 children could not be located, the number has turned out to be even greater, according to an email obtained by NBC News.

In the email, Steven Herzog, the lawyer leading the effort to locate relatives of the children and reunite the families, says that the 666 children – roughly 20 percent of whom were under 5 years of age when they were taken from their parents – remain separated.

The new number is due to the fact that the government initially failed to provide phone number contacts for 129 of the children.

“We would appreciate the government providing any available updated contact information, or other information that may be helpful in establishing contact for all 666 of these parents,” Herzog wrote in the email to attorneys from the U.S. Justice Department who are representing the Trump administration.

The Trump administration imposed its “zero tolerance” policy at the U.S. southern border with Mexico between April and June 2018. However, the Trump administration also separated families during a prior pilot program in the El Paso Sector. Most of the children referred to in the email were ripped from their parents during the pilot program, but the total also includes some who were separated under the zero tolerance program.

The new number “includes individuals in addition to 545 for whom we got no information from government that would allow meaningful searches but are hopeful the government will now provide with that information,” according to Lee Gelernt, the deputy director of the ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project.

Last month it was revealed in a House Judiciary Committee report that the administration had full knowledge that it wouldn’t be able to reunite migrant families under the separation policies, but decided to implement it anyway.

The administration’s policy resulted in the seizure of nearly 3,000 migrant children—including many with physical and mental disabilities—from their parents, most of whom are believed to have been deported from the U.S.

In August it was also revealed that in 2018, Trump administration senior adviser Stephen Miller – a highly influential figure in the White House with extremist views on immigration matters – had proposed extending the family separation policies so that 25,000 additional children would be taken from their parents, including those who legally presented at ports of entry seeking asylum.

The policy has led to enormous emotional and psychological trauma for both parents and children – who were frequently told by U.S. officials that they would never see each other again – and has been described as “torture” and “state-sanctioned child abuse” by Physicians for Human Rights.

Additionally, some of the children were handed over to U.S. families, who have been able to petition for permanent custody for them – meaning that some children are never able to see their parents again and turning the policy into one that amounts to kidnapping.

The administration reluctantly rolled back the policy after it faced a storm of public outrage amid the emergence of stories such as that of a breastfeeding baby being torn from her mother and a father who was driven to suicide after he was separated from his wife and child.

President-elect Joe Biden has pledged to form a task force that would work to reunite all the separated children with their families. Biden has called the family separation policy “criminal,” but hasn’t commented about whether he has any plans to criminally prosecute officials who planned and implemented the policy.

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