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These Incredible Kinetic Sculptures Move in a Lifelike Manner, Powered by the Wind

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wind-powered kinetic sculptures
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Dutch artist and inventor Theo Jansen has created something truly remarkable. Most probably, you haven’t seen anything like this before. His kinetic sculptures, called “Strandbeests,” or beach beasts, are huge skeletal constructs that are designed to move powered solely by the energy of the sea breeze.

Jansen’s insect-like creatures are made from ordinary plastic tubes and move without the use of electronics. The artist has also equipped his beasts with recycled plastic bottles, valves and pumps. Moreover, using air pressure, he has managed to give them an analog of muscles and nerves and even something similar to the brain, able to respond to the surrounding environment.

wind-powered kinetic sculptures

Having studied the results of various evolutionary experiments and having made numerous calculations, the artist found a way to give his sophisticated beasts sensory mechanisms that enable them to detect water, sense the hardness of the sand and the strength of the wind, and avoid obstacles. How incredible is that? It’s no surprise that some people call Jansen a modern-day Leonardo da Vinci.

wind-powered kinetic sculptures

“They are blind and deaf and they have to navigate somehow,” the artist told Gizmag. “You can do a lot with compressed air. They have a sort of tongue, which is a long tube and as soon as air pressure is in there, it can feel if the sand is even or uneven, i.e. if it is hard sand or soft sand. It steers away from the soft sand, towards the sea.”

wind-powered kinetic sculptures

wind-powered kinetic sculptures

Jansen, who has been developing wind-powered kinetic sculptures for over two decades, aspires to create an entirely independent artificial animal. For this purpose, he integrates more senses and principles into each new creature he designs. Now the artist is working on the ability to migrate which he is mastering with his new beast called the Plaudens Vela (fluttering sail beast), which is able to walk even at a low wind speed.

wind-powered kinetic sculptures vela

Within the next 20 years I want the animals to be independent from me, so they take their own decisions – when to walk on the beach, what to anchor themselves against during storms or when to move away from the water,” Jansen told BBC.

This sounds like an ambitious plan, but seeing how these artificial structures walk on the beach like if they were living creatures is quite convincing on its own. Check out the video below to see it for yourself:

Image credit: Theo Jansen

Consciousness

10 Things You Don’t Wan’t To Know About Yourself

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“Freedom is the right to tell people what they don’t want to hear.” ~George Orwell

Sick of all those self-affirmation articles? Tired of all the self-help gurus blowing sunshine up your skirt? Need something a little more grounding? More down-to-earth? More humbling? Here’s a fresh batch of wake-up calls and kicks-in-the-shin straight from the oven. Get it while its hot…

1.) You are an animal:

“What a chimera then is humankind. What a novelty; what a monster, what a chaos.” ~Blaise Pascal
This one is painfully obvious, but you probably need a reminder.

You are a naked ape. You are blood and bones and improbable apposable thumbs. You were born from the womb and you will one day be food for worms. In the womb, you went through all the phases of evolution: from a single-celled amoeba to a multicellular tadpole to a brain-wielding infant.

In your short life, you will piss and s*** and bleed. You will rage and cry and sleep. You will go through all the profane motions of being a mortal mammal within an amoral universe. And here’s the real kick in the teeth: it’s going to hurt like hell. Hope you have a good sense of humor, because you’re going to need it.

2.) You are fallible:

“Things fall apart. The center cannot hold.” ~W.B. Yeats

You are terribly imperfect. You will make mistakes. More so, you are mistaken about a great many things. Most of which you will probably never admit to yourself, because admitting you are wrong is one of the most difficult things a human being can do.

But it goes deeper than that. There are fallibilities within fallibilities. It’s a veritable fractal forest of fallibility. A fractal wrongness, if you will.

You are more wrong about things than you can possibly imagine, and yet you insist. You force your wrongness. You are fierce with it, ruthlessly certain with it. You are so hungry for rightness that you bludgeon the Truth with your wrongness. All the while imagining that you are right.

As it turns out, you are more likely to be right by admitting that you are probably wrong than by declaring that you are probably right.

3.) You are a hypocrite:

“You have not learned to play and mock the way a man ought to play and mock. Are we not always seated at a great table for play and mockery? Learn to laugh at yourselves as a man ought to laugh. Learn to laugh beyond yourselves, and learn to laugh well.” ~Nietzsche

You are a hypocrite by nature. By the fact that you perceive an unfathomable reality with fallible faculties. It’s not even your fault. Just the fact that you are a “you” precludes hypocrisy. The self is smoke and mirrors, masks and mayhem. More akin to a chaotic theater of actors than a single personality.

Indeed, the self is masks all the way down perceiving delusions all the way up. Hypocrisy was always inevitable. Merely the biproduct of a fallible self.

Amidst this mayhem of fallible selfhood, you will experience dissimulation and self-deception, dishonesty and deep pretension, inauthenticity and artificiality. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. The rest is hidden beneath layer upon layer of subconscious/unconscious double-dealings, feigned sincerity, two-faced unctuousness, and the mealymouthed choruses of canting contradictions.

Your hypocrisy knows no bounds, so you might as well own up to it.

4.) You will fail:

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.” ~Samuel Beckett

Failure is a given when you are merely a fallible, hypocritical animal going through the motions of living life in an uncertain universe.

But there is wisdom hidden in failure if you are keen to it. Setbacks can be transformed into steppingstones. Tragedy can be hardwired into comedy. Catastrophe can be whittled into accomplishment. You can build a ladder out of the shattered pieces of your life and climb out of the abyss.

But guess what? You will probably fail again. The higher you climb the farther you may fall. When it comes to failure, there is always a deeper abyss. Defeat, hard luck, and utter collapse are right around the corner. Disappointment is Accomplishment’s kissing cousin. Tragedy is Triumph’s red-headed stepchild. Today’s achievement could very well be tomorrow’s tripwire. So be it. Use it all as a sharpening stone for your all-too-mortal soul.

5.) You are never not broken:

“We adore chaos because we love to produce order.” ~M.C. Escher

Wholeness does not imply perfection. It infers embracing brokenness as an essential part of being human. There is never a state in which you are not broken.
You are a walking, talking broken heart going through the motions of breaking apart and coming back together again. This also applies to the mind, the body, and the soul. You are constantly in a state of repair.

Your suffering is sufferable. What’s insufferable is your ideal of perfection. There will always be pain. There will always be heartache. There will always be existential angst. We wreck ourselves against these. Then we knock out the dents, mend the cracks, and heal the wounds. We do this in the hope that it will make us stronger. But perhaps it won’t.
The wound may or may not become a sacred wound. All you can do is hurt, heal, and hope. Hurt, heal, and hope. From fragility to robustness to antifragility, you will always be in a state of falling apart and coming back together again. Embrace it.

6.) You have a dark side:

“There are no shortcuts to wholeness. The only way to become whole is to put our arms lovingly around everything we know ourselves to be: self-serving and generous, spiteful and compassionate, cowardly and courageous, treacherous and trustworthy. We must be able to say, ‘I am all of the above.’” ~Parker J. Palmer

You have a shadow. Even your shadow has a shadow called the golden shadow. Your shadow is your repressed or unconscious self, struggling to be liberated and more conscious. Awareness is key. Becoming aware of our shadow side is shining a light into the darkness and giving our dark side permission to shine its blacklight back into the blinding light, which creates a unity of opposites.
An empowered dark side balances out the equation of the complicated human condition. Without this balance, you risk fragile one-dimensionality and a brittle ego terrified of taking responsibility for its shadow and thus fearful of the shadow of others.

You cannot fully know yourself without knowing your dark side and embracing your shadow. Such wholeness breeds wisdom and the ability to experience the full range of what it means to be human.

7.) Your beliefs limit you:

“If you adopt an idea or perception as the absolute truth, you close the door of your mind. Attachment to views, attachment to ideas, attachment to perceptions are the biggest obstacle to truth.” ~The Buddha

Your beliefs are incredibly restricting. You’ve been indoctrinated to think that you need to believe. Even worse, you’ve been brainwashed to believe more than you think.

In the battle against bewitchment, all beliefs, no matter how powerful or well-intended, are a hinderance to clear thought and self-improvement.

tter to think rather than believe. Thinking that something might be true allows for error, fallibility, and wrongness. Believing that something is certainly true cuts us off from all other possibilities. Belief is all or nothing, predicated upon faith despite facts or evidence. Thought is open-ended, taking beliefs, facts, and evidence into deep consideration and then using probability and validity to discover the truth.

More importantly, thinking rather than believing allows for skepticism and questioning. It is considered blasphemous to question a belief. Whereas questioning a thought is considered appropriate. Might as well just skip belief altogether and simply take things into thoughtful consideration.

8.) You are culturally conditioned:

“When war turns whole populations into sleepwalkers, outlaws don’t join forces with alarm clocks. Outlaws, like poets, rearrange the nightmare.” ~Tom Robbins

You are programmed to think a certain way. This programming has propped-up your identity into perceiving a particular worldview that may or may not be based in reality. It might not even be healthy. This identity tied up in your worldview is an abstraction of an abstraction, a story within a story that you’ve convinced yourself is true.

But you have the power to reprogram your programming.

We are all conditioned by culture. The key is to become aware of it and to weigh our conditioning against the truth of reality. Then recondition the conditioning. We each have our own Plato’s Cave to navigate.

The extent to which you can become aware of your own “cave” will be the extent of your flexibility, open-mindedness, and personal freedom.

9.) You know less than you think:

“Some people are more certain of everything than I am of anything.” ~Robert Rubin

You think you know more than you actually do. Your certainty about a great many things limits your imagination, creative thinking, and ability to question. It leads to dogmatic reasoning and close-mindedness.

ou are just so certain, aren’t you? Your certitude is so powerful that you cannot see past your beliefs. Hung up on what you’ve found, you have given up the search. Your journey has come to an end. Your certainty has led you to a dead-end. You are stuck. And the only way out is to question what you think you know.

The more you question, the more you realize that the only answer that makes any sense is to keep questioning. When you stop questioning the journey for truth comes to an end and stagnation, sloth, and dogmatism begin to rule your world. Keep things in perspective by accepting that you know less than you think you do and keep questioning.

10.) Your life is terribly inconsequential:

“Don’t slip on the banana peel of nihilism, even while listening to the roar of Nothingness.” ~Lawrence Ferlinghetti

When it comes down to it, your life is a flash in the pan. It’s dust in the cosmic wind. It’s an infinitesimally insignificant spark in an unfathomably dark, unforgiving, and meaningless universe. But it is a spark.

What you do won’t matter in the grand scheme of things. But it’s very important that you do it anyway. Why? Because you are the universe attempting to become aware of itself. You are an awareness machine in an otherwise unaware cosmos. You are a meaning-generator in a reality void of meaning. You might be nothing more than a speck in the universe, but you are also the entire universe in a speck.

Either way, you will one day be dust. Your tiny insignificant life will end. Face that fleetingness with a fierceness. Laugh into the abyss. Face fear with fearlessness. Climb the highest mountain and kick God in the nuts. Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Or not. None of it will matter in the end. You will still be the butt-end of the cosmic joke. It’s all laughable. So you might as well have a laugh.

Gary Z McGee, Self-inflicted Philosophy, republished here with permission.

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The Weeknd’s New Music Video Leaves Fans Shook With ‘Plastic Surgery Disaster’ Look

Elias Marat

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The Weeknd has unveiled his new look for the new year, and it’s leaving some fans in shock.

The 30-year-old singer’s new music video for the song, “Save Your Tears,” depicts the artist in the throes of what can only be described as an all-out plastic surgery disaster.

In the video, which dropped on Tuesday to promote his “After Hours” album, The Weeknd sings “But then you saw me, caught you by surprise,” while sporting a shaved-down and crooked nose, bloated cheeks, grotesquely puffed-out lips, surgical scars and a host of other features.

The video has already garnered over 1 million views on YouTube on the same day it was released.

However, some viewers were left in shock by the hideous new look of the typically handsome young artist, whose real name is Abel Makkonen Tesfaye.

“Why does The Weeknd look like that in the Save Your Tears music video!?! I don’t like it,” one fan tweeted, while another cited the lyrics to his 2018 song “Can’t Feel My Face,” joking, “i bet he really cant feel his face now.”

Other user on Twitter joked that he could portray the Batman villain The Joker – a strange twist for an artist dubbed The Dark Knight – while others drew apt comparisons to the late King of Pop, Michael Jackson, who underwent a number of cosmetic surgeries in the years leading up to his death.

However, it’s more likely that the music video is a simple continuation of the body horror saga of his past music videos, which were steeped in dark and gory imarery.

In the video for “Heartless,” the Weeknd can be seen tripping and partying in Vegas. In “Blinding Lights,” the artist then gets bloodied up. “In Your Eyes” features the singer getting decapitated, but he is subsequently reanimated in the video for “Too Late,” where his head is attached to another man’s body.

The Weeknd’s face has also been covered in bandages and bruised in recent public performances, lending credence to speculation that the Starboy’s new look is the result of too many sessions under the knife.

The latest visuals are the likely result of some combination of prosthetics and CGI.

The artist recently told TMRW magazine that he is taking inspiration for his new work both from the Black Lives Matter movement and the coronavirus outbreak, which forced him to cancel his planned tour to promote his hit album, “After Hours.”

“I have been more inspired and creative during the pandemic than I might normally be while on the road,” the artist revealed.

“The pandemic, the Black Lives Matter movement and the tensions of the election have mostly created a sense of gratitude for what I have and closeness with the people near me,” he added.

Continuing, he explained that his iconoclastic vocal style was largely inspired by the Ethiopian artist he grew up listening to, which he combined with other musical styles he began listening to while he developed as an artist.

“The older I got, I was exposed to more music, and my voice became a chameleon going into different characters with each album,” he continued. “By following my own path and breaking industry norms, it seems to be influencing others.”

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In Strange Casting Choice, Creed Singer Scott Stapp to Portray Frank Sinatra in New Film

Elias Marat

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2020 has been a rare year, indeed. The year has seen a global pandemic, massive protests, unrest, natural disasters, and no shortage of unfortunate events. With the country winding to a close, it would be naïve for anyone to believe that all of this craziness will suddenly grind to a halt when the clock hits midnight on New Year’s Eve and we shift to the 2021 calendar.

And as if to prove that 2020 could be one of the most unsettling years in living memory, it’s just been announced that Creed singer Scott Stapp will be playing Frank Sinatra in a biopic about Ronald Reagan.

Yes, that’s right, Stapp – who’s been described as a “marble-mouthed baritone” – will be portraying the legendary crooner, Ol’ Blue Eyes himself, in a historical drama.

Billboard reports that the upcoming drama Reagan, which will star Dennis Quaid as the 40th President of the United States, has cast the alternative rock singer to play the late lone-time leader of the Rat Pack.

The casting choice is curious, given that Stapp is well known for his exaggerated and over-the-top “yarling” singing style (also known as “Hunger Dunger Dang”), which consists of a exaggerated version of the nasal baritone drone originally introduced by Pearl Jam singer Eddie Vedder.

Stapp himself seems aware of the irony, telling Billboard, “Sinatra in performance mode was an exercise in restraint. He had this steely, stylish swagger and his sheer presence commanded a room. I was excited to join the cast and blown away by the on-set attention to detail, style, and overall production.”

According to the magazine, it won’t be a major role, but the film does contain a scene where Reagan visits the Cocoanut Grove, a once-famous nightclub in the Boston region that was once popular among Hollywood celebs in the 1930s.

The scene where Stapp will step up on stage and croon takes place when Reagan was president of the Screen Actors Guild, a position he held between 1947 and 1951, and again in 1959. 

Again, it’s a very curious casting choice, as the 47-year-old rock star hardly resembles a young Sinatra. Perhaps the studio plans to digitally alter Stapp’s voice and face so that he more closely resembles the Sultan of Swoon? Your guess is as good as ours.

Stapp has had a bit of a rough time in recent years after his career spiraled out of control due to drug and alcohol abuse, a struggle with bipolar disorder, and an eventual psychotic breakdown in 2014. Since then, he appears to be on a road to recovery and has even opened up about the fact that even his own kids tease him about his singing on songs like “With Arms Wide Open.”

Reagan is set to drop in 2021, and will also star Penelope Ann Miller as Nancy Reagan.

“We are honored to have Scott in Reagan,” director Sean McNamara said. “Scott’s known for big, high energy performances so it was a thrill to see him shift gears to embody Sinatra’s contained charisma.”

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