Connect with us

News

In Major First, New System Lets Paralyzed Users Control Tablet Computer Wirelessly

A major breakthrough for people suffering paralysis and other permanent disabilities!

Published

on

Like this article? Get the latest from The Mind Unleashed in your inbox. Sign up right here.

In what could be a major breakthrough for people suffering paralysis and other permanent disabilities, the first wireless command to a computer has been demonstrated.

According to a new study published in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, scientists at Brown University say that the new system called BrainGate can transmit brain signals at “single-neuron resolution and in full broadband fidelity.”

BrainGate clinical trial participants with paralysis used a small transmitter connected to a person’s brain motor cortex to manipulate the interface of a tablet computer.

Participants were able to achieve the same typing speeds and point-and-click accuracy on the BrainGate system as they could with wired systems.

“We’ve demonstrated that this wireless system is functionally equivalent to the wired systems that have been the gold standard,” said John Simeral, an assistant professor of engineering at Brown University.

“The signals are recorded and transmitted with appropriately similar fidelity, which means we can use the same decoding algorithms we used with wired equipment,” Simeral said.

“The only difference is that people no longer need to be physically tethered to our equipment, which opens up new possibilities in terms of how the system can be used,” he added.

Neural interface technologies have attracted such high-profile figures as Elon Musk and social media titan Facebook in recent years.

“With this system, we’re able to look at brain activity, at home, over long periods in a way that was nearly impossible before,” said Brown University engineering professor and clinical trial leader Leigh Hochberg.

“This will help us to design decoding algorithms that provide for the seamless, intuitive, reliable restoration of communication and mobility for people with paralysis,” Hochberg added.

Typos, corrections and/or news tips? Email us at [email protected]