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American Taking Selfie is Gored in the Neck During Pamplona Bull Run

A San Francisco man narrowly avoided death after being skewered in the neck while attempting to take a selfie.

Elias Marat

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American Bull Run

(TMU) — A San Francisco man narrowly avoided death after being skewered in the neck while attempting to take a selfie during the annual Pamplona bull run in Spain.

The 46-year-old was hoping to snap a shot of the traditional “Running of the Bulls” before the bull’s horn gored him, sinking deep into his neck and fracturing a part of his cheekbone.

Jaime Alvarez was one among hundreds of runners at this year’s San Fermin festival in Pamplona, where massive crowds run alongside bulls in a cobblestone street leading to the bullring.

Alvarez says that he ran most of the 913-yard course ahead of the bulls, but by the time they reached the bullfighting plaza, the animals had caught up with him.

At that stage, Alvarez climbed onto a nearby fence before returning to the arena to shoot a small video as a keepsake. He explained that he wanted “a 5-second video scene to say ‘Here I am, I did it.'”

That’s when a stray bull rapidly came bearing down on him. The bulls that are forced to race in the Pamplona festival usually weigh upwards of 1,300 lbs.

Alvarez added:

“The impact was unlike anything I’ve ever felt. It was like being hit by a car or a truck …  It was scary.” 

His life was likely saved after another man grabbed him by the arm and rushed him through the crowd to receive aid from paramedics.

Alvarez, who is recovering from surgery and now in stable condition, told the Associated Press:

“The joy and the excitement of being in the bullring quickly turned into a scare, into real fear for my life.

In the course of a few seconds, a million thoughts came to my mind, and that of dying was definitely one of them.” 

Alvarez admitted that he had been swept up by the atmosphere of the festival, which regularly draws crowds of up to 1 million tourists.

He also said that he felt guilty about ignoring the wishes of his wife and daughter, who urged him to not take part in the bull run. The family was on their way to a soccer tournament elsewhere in Spain where his son was participating.

Alvarez said he hopes to return to the festival, but this time as a spectator rather than a participant.

https://twitter.com/PETAUK/status/1148180174116216832

The Bay Area attorney was also among around seven people who have been injured this year in the bull run, including a 49-year-old British man whose ankle fracture required surgery, reported France24.

Others who were injured include two other Americans, three Spaniards, and a man who was punctured in the back by a bull’s horn and treated on the scene, according to the Red Cross.

The Pamplona bull run, which takes place from July 6-14, has aroused worldwide controversy because of the cruel treatment of the animals, who are first shocked into taking part in the race before they are tormented in the bullring for the pleasure of onlookers.

Animal rights group PETA claims that at least 48 bulls are killed in the “barbaric bloodbath,” where they suffer a slow death while repeatedly being stabbed.

PETA said:

“During a typical bullfight, several men taunt and stab a bull with harpoon-like banderillas until he becomes weakened from blood loss.

Then, the matador stabs the exhausted animal with a sword, and if the bull doesn’t die straight away, he’ll commonly use a dagger to cut the animal’s spinal cord. Many bulls are paralyzed but still conscious as their ears or tails are cut off as trophies.”

Across Spain and Latin America, support for the bullfights that claim about 7,000 animal lives annually is on the wane. Last year, there were 56 percent fewer official fights in Spain than in 2007.

By Elias Marat | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com

Animals

Cher Escorted World’s Loneliest Elephant To a New Life in Cambodia

Elias Marat

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A 36-year-old elephant who garnered worldwide sympathy after being dubbed “the world’s loneliest elephant” will be turning the page on a dark chapter of his life and enjoying brighter days ahead at a renowned sanctuary in Cambodia, thanks to the hard-fought efforts of U.S. pop star Cher.

Kaavan had long been Pakistan’s only Asian elephant, and suffered from poor health and wretched conditions at a dilapidated zoo in Islamabad, where the bull elephant was unable to exercise and gained excessive weight while living in a structure decried by animal rights groups as totally inappropriate.

Now relocated to Cambodia, Kaavan will now make the province of Oddar Meanchey his home, where he will live in a special wildlife sanctuary along with 600 other elephants.

“Cambodia is pleased to welcome Kaavan. No longer will he be ‘the world’s loneliest elephant,’” Cambodia’s deputy environment minister, Neth Pheaktra, said. “We expect to breed Kaavan with local elephants – this is an effort to conserve the genetic fold.”

When Kaavan’s companion died in 2012, the suffering pachyderm was forced to contend with isolation and descended into “zoochosis” – a type of mental illness brought about by miserable living conditions and solitude, reports BBC. Scarred both mentally and physically, he soon earned the ignominious title of the “world’s loneliest animal.”

However, after years of suffering in silence, animal rights groups turned Kavaan’s plight into a cause célèbre – with Cher using her social media clout and the wildlife protection group she co-founded, Free the Wild, to back the campaign in 2016.

“I thought, ‘how can I fix this? How can I save an elephant who’s been shackled to a shed for 17 years and who is a thousand miles away?’,” Cher said in a statement distributed by the Smithsonian Channel, which is filming a documentary about Kaavan. “This is Free The Wild’s first big rescue and I am so proud.”

When Islamabad’s High Court finally shuttered the zoo over its squalid conditions and issued an order freeing Kaavan in May, granting animal welfare group Four Paws International (FPI) permission to relocate the creature, Cher called it one of the “greatest moments” in her life.

For years, Four Paws has worked alongside Cher and Free the Wild to secure Kaavan’s release.

Ahead of his trip on Monday, Cher was filmed serenading Kaavan in Pakistan with her classic song, “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes.”

On Monday, Kaavan and Cher arrived in Cambodia and were greeted with fanfare from animal conservationists and officials.

“I’m so happy and I am so proud he is here,” Cher told AFP at Siem Reap airport. “He’s a wonderful, wonderful animal.”

Kaavan had a peaceful flight and conducted himself “like a frequent flyer” during the journey from Pakistan, said Four Paws veterinarian Dr. Amir Khalil. Kaavan even ate and slept during the “uneventful” flight and showed no signs of stress, reports the Guardian.

On Friday, prior to the journey to Cambodia, Cher met Pakistan’s Prime Minister Imran Khan and thanked him on Twitter “for making it possible for me to take Kaavan to Cambodia.”

In a statement from Khan’s office, the prime minister and former cricket superstar extended an invitation to Cher to continue engaging in environmental initiatives in Pakistan.

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Ancient History

Megalodon Fossils Show How Biggest-Ever Shark Had Nurseries All Over the World

Elias Marat

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The massive megalodon, the largest shark to ever roam the seas, had their own nursery areas all over the globe that allowed the apex predators to raise their young and populate the world prior to their extinction.

A new study, published in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters, reveals that nurseries belonging to the massive creatures have been found in across vast geographic distances where fossils belonging to both young and old megalodons were discovered.

The five likely nurseries include sites off Spain’s east coast, two off the coast of the United States, and two in Panama.

Megalodon (Otodus megalodon), whose name means “large tooth,” lived between 23 million and 3.6 million years ago until it went extinct during a period of global cooling. For 13 million years, the megalodon was the king of the sea.

The megalodon was not only the largest shark in the world, but also the biggest fish – and quite possibly the most powerful predator – to ever exist. Its teeth alone measured 18 centimeters long, and evidence shows that it could have grown to reach up to 60 feet in length.

However, because megalodon bodies were mostly comprised of cartilage – which cannot fossilize – the shark’s teeth, vertebrae and fossilized feces have been the main way researchers have calculated the shark’s body measurements.

The existence of the nurseries shows that young megalodon were still quite susceptible to attacks by other predators.

To keep the young megalodon safe, their shark parents would give birth to their young in shallow, warm water nurseries located near coastlines. In these special regions, juvenile megalodon were able to access their prey while facing few dangers from rival predators.

“Our analyses support the presence of five potential nurseries ranging from the Langhian (middle Miocene) to the Zanclean (Pliocene), with higher densities of individuals with estimated body lengths within the typical range of neonates and young juveniles,” the scientists wrote in the abstract for the study.

“These results reveal, for the first time, that nursery areas were commonly used by O. megalodon over large temporal and spatial scales, reducing early mortality and playing a key role in maintaining viable adult populations,” the authors added.

The nurseries were ideal sites that allowed young megalodons to mature into adults in a process that took about 25 years.

Experts investigated 25 teeth belonging to megalodon that were found in the Reverté and Vidal regions in Tarragona, Spain. The study led to the conclusion that these locations were filled with sharks that had body lengths consistent with the normal range of newborns and young juveniles, measuring 13 feet in length for one-month-old sharks to 36 feet in length for older juveniles.

A separate study released in September found that a 52.5-foot-long adult megalodon had heads that measure up to 15.3 feet long, with dorsal fins measuring about 5.3 feet tall and tails reaching 12.6 feet. To put this into perspective, an adult human could stand on a shark’s back and be roughly the same height as the dorsal fin.

The study’s findings also reveal that the shark’s reliance on nurseries likely played a role in their demise, when the world cooled near the end of the Pliocene period and sea levels declined.

“Ultimately, the presumed reliance of O. megalodon on the presence of suitable nursery grounds might have also been determinant in the demise of this iconic top predatory shark,” the authors of the study noted.

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Animals

Minks Infected With Mutated Covid “Rise From Their Graves” After Being Killed in Mass Culling

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If you thought that this year couldn’t get any weirder, now we can add covid infected minks rising from their graves to the list of strange 2020 happenings. The minks that appeared to rise from the dead had been infected with a mutated strain of COVID-19 in Denmark.

A Danish police spokesman, Thomas Kristensen, urged local residents to stay calm, and explained that these minks are not actually zombies. Kristensen said that gasses in the decay process sometimes cause the bodies to move.

“As the bodies decay, gases can be formed. This causes the whole thing to expand a little. In this way, in the worst cases, the mink get pushed out of the ground,” Kristensen said, according to the Guardian.

Another issue is the fact that the animals were placed in shallow graves because the process was rushed. The graves were just over three feet deep, which allowed some witnesses to see the movement. Now officials are planning to order the graves to be dug twice as deep.

“This is a natural process. Unfortunately, one metre of soil is not just one metre of soil –it depends on what type of soil it is. The problem is that the sandy soil in West Jutland is too light. So we have had to lay more soil on top,” Kristensen said.

Regardless of the scientific explanation, the incident has sparked plenty of conversation on social media.

Local residents shared photos and videos of the bodies coming out of the ground to social media with captions like “the year of the zombie mutant killer mink” and “run … The mink are coming for you.”

Kristensen warned that anyone who might see a shallow mink grave should stay away because there is still a small risk of infection. Even though the minks had been disinfected before being buried, there is still a chance that the virus can be passed on to a person.

He said that it could be possible that “small quantities of bacteria may still be trapped in their fur” adding that it is “never healthy to get close to dead animals, so therefore this is of course something to stay away from.”

Sadly, the country plans to kill all 15 million minks that live in the country. The country is reportedly responsible for producing 40% of the world’s mink fur. The country’s mink farmers have culled more than 10 million mink so far, according to the latest numbers.

The mink burial grounds will also be monitored around the clock, and they are working to put a fence up around the area. Still, despite these security measures, some officials are concerned that the burial grounds are too close to local water sources, which could potentially put the water supply at risk. Some officials, such as two mayors in the region, are suggesting that the corpses of the minks be burned.

As of Wednesday, Denmark has reported more than 74,000 COVID-19 cases and 800 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

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