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Watch This Small Monkey Use a Sharpened Rock to Shatter Glass Cage at a Zoo in China

“This monkey is unlike other monkeys,” one of the zoo’s staff told the media.

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Monkey Rock Glass Zoo China
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(TMU) — Nobody wants to live in captivity, and a new video from China shows just what can happen when an intelligent animal held captive in a zoo has too much time on its hands and little to do.

Such was the case on August 20, when visitors to Zhengzhou Zoo in China’s Central Henan Province were treated to the impressive sight of a Colombian white-faced capuchin monkey using a sharp-edged rock to break down a glass wall of its enclosure, according to the People’s Daily.

Much to the visitors’ surprise—and that of the little monkey, as well—it only took a couple focused blows with a sharpened rock to quickly shatter the glass wall into thousands of small shards. The monkey itself quickly retreated after the deed was done.

The video is a clear sign of the intelligence of primates, who enjoy being held in captivity no more than we humans would.

The Daily Mail reports a tourist named Wang as saying:

“The monkey was sharpening the stone, then it started hitting it on the glass.

The monkey scared itself away, but it came back to take another look and even touched it.”

Tian Shuliao, a member of the zoo staff, told local news outlets that capuchin monkeys are generally adept when it comes to the use of tools:

“This monkey is unlike other monkeys. This one knows how to use tools to break walnuts. When we feed walnuts to other monkeys, they only know to bite it.

But it had never hit the glass before though. This is the first time. It’s toughened glass, so it would never have got out.”

Various species of primates are able to use tools, including chimpanzees who use stone tools and can even craft spears for use against their enemies. Crows, eagles, dolphins, and sea otters are also capable of using tools to fend for themselves in the animal kingdom, either for the sake of defending themselves or to crack open hard coverings such as shells to reach the tasty, fleshy morsels inside.

Sadly, the capuchin residing at Zhengzhou Zoo has been left to discover new ways to entertain itself—according to zoo staff, all potential stone “tools” have been removed from the enclosures and patrols have been stepped up to prevent what may have been a sneaky escape attempt.

By Elias Marat | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com

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Animals

Scientists Catch a Glimpse of a Ultra-Rare Giant Phantom Jelly, With Bizarre Ribbon-Like Arms

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Researchers have seen a large deep-sea jellyfish with the assistance of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) named Doc Ricketts off the coast of California, in an extremely rare sighting. The footage revealed the creature’s unique and exquisite features.

The uncommon encounter was documented in November this year, 990 meters (3,200 ft) deep in Monterey Bay, according to a report issued by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).

Youtube Screenshot

The enigmatic phantom jellyfish was initially discovered in 1899, but scientists did not recognize it as a distinct species until 1960. Scientists still know very little about this creature.

The specimen of the huge phantom jelly has only been seen 110 times in 110 years across the world. According to the MBARI research, despite thousands of dives, their ROVs have only observed this amazing species nine times.

The huge phantom jellyfish has the following characteristics:

The bell of this deep-sea denizen is more than one meter (3.3 feet) broad, with four ribbon-like oral (or mouth) arms that can grow to be more than 10 meters (33 feet) long, according to an MBARI report.

Youtube Screenshot

The species is said to inhabit anywhere between the surface and 21,900 feet in depth. It does, however, remain in the twilight zone, which is just beyond the reach of sunlight.

The organism, formally known as ‘Stygiomedusa gigantea’, is found all across the planet except in the Arctic Ocean, according to the experts.

Youtube Screenshot

It’s worth noting that, in the past, scientists depended on trawl-nets to examine deep-sea species; but, the jellies, which transform into a viscous goo in trawl nets, were difficult to research using this outdated method. Fish, crabs, and squids are among the only creatures that can be effectively studied from nets.

Researchers may now examine these creatures in their native habitat with high-definition footage thanks to the robot cams. I, personally, prefer this “no-touch” approach.

Watch the mesmerizing video here:

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Dolphin Swims Through Louisiana Neighborhood in Aftermath of Hurricane Ida

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A Louisiana family was shocked to find a dolphin swimming through their neighborhood in the aftermath of Hurricane Ida.

Amanda Huling and her family were assessing the damage to their neighborhood in Slidell, Louisiana, when they noticed the dolphin swimming through the inundated suburban landscape.

In video shot by Huling, the marine mammal’s dorsal fin can be seen emerging from the water.

“The dolphin was still there as of last night but I am in contact with an organization who is going to be rescuing it within the next few days if it is still there,” Huling told FOX 35.

Ida slammed into the coast of Louisiana this past weekend. The Category 4 hurricane ravaged the power grid of the region, plunging residents of New Orleans and upwards of 1 million homes and businesses in Louisiana and Mississippi into the dark for an indefinite period of time.

Officials have warned that the damage has been so extensive that it could take weeks to repair the power grid, reports Associated Press.

Also in Slidell, a 71-year-old man was attacked by an alligator over the weekend while he was in his flooded shed. The man went missing and is assumed dead, reports WDSU.

Internet users began growing weary last year about the steady stream of stories belonging to a “nature is healing” genre, as people stayed indoors and stories emerged about animals taking back their environs be it in the sea or in our suburbs.

However, these latest events are the surreal realities of a world in which extreme weather events are fast becoming the new normal – disrupting our lives in sometimes predictable, and occasionally shocking and surreal, ways.

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